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The latest news and information on all aspects of graphene research, development, application and commercialization.

 

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THE SECRET LIFE OF BATTERIES

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Friday, February 22, 2019
Updated: Friday, February 22, 2019

Koffi Pierre Yao, a new assistant professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Delaware, is uncovering novel insights about what happens inside the batteries that power our smartphones, laptops, and electric vehicles. He plans to use this knowledge to develop faster-charging batteries that make electric vehicles the go-to automobiles for drivers.

Several of today’s electric vehicles, such as the Tesla Model 3 and Nissan Leaf, run on lithium-ion batteries. But it takes inconveniently too long to recharge those vehicles when you can fill up your gas tank in the time it takes to pick up gas-station coffee. In a lithium-ion battery, positively charged lithium ions move through the electrode to deliver energy.

Scientists all over the world do time-consuming research on lithium-ion batteries in an attempt to optimize these power units. “Usually people will make an electrode, test it, make another one, test it, and so on, and it’s kind of a serial process,” said Yao.

Instead, Yao uses physical probes to look inside batteries while they work and develop a direct physical understanding of how lithium ions flow within batteries. When a battery is charging, the lithium flows unevenly in a way that’s difficult to measure. Yao started working on this while he was a postdoctoral associate at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), a position he held from 2016 until 2018, when he joined UD’s faculty.

In a new paper published in Energy & Environmental Science, a journal published by the Royal Society of Chemistry, Yao describes how he and his colleagues at ANL used X-rays to get a micron-scale movie of how lithium distributes within the electrode while lithium-ion batteries are running.

“We put an industrial-grade battery under an X-ray beam and mapped the distribution of the lithium within the electrodes,” he said.



Yao and his colleagues knew that the lithium did not distribute homogeneously. Imagine a group of people running through a small doorway. It takes time for people to spread out into the interior of the room; therefore, there will be crowding at the entry point. That’s similar to how lithium moves through the electrode. Still, Yao and his colleagues were surprised at the extent to which lithium scattered inhomogeneously.

The goal is to use this knowledge to reduce testing time and speed up the research and development (R&D) process for these batteries.

In another new paper published in Advanced Energy Materials, Yao describes how he and his colleagues used X-rays to quantify the activity in a silicon-graphite electrode. Cell phone batteries typically contain graphite, but silicon offers some potential benefits over graphite.

“We’re interested in silicon because it can increase the capacity of the electrode by a factor of 10 compared to graphite,” he said. However, silicon is less stable than graphite and degrades faster, so a blend of the two may prove to be a viable solution. “Some of the lithium goes into the graphite, and some goes into the silicon,” he said.

Yao and his colleagues sought to discover exactly where the lithium ions traveled within this blended electrode.

“It’s something people haven’t previously been able to do in the literature,” Yao said. “We provide a clear picture of which of silicon and graphite plays host to lithium at any point in time. Now we can go forward and manipulate this pattern to stabilize the cycling.” This knowledge can help Yao in his quest to design novel particles to make faster-charging and higher energy batteries.

At UD, Yao plans to expand upon his research on batteries with his colleagues at the Center for Fuel Cells and Batteries and more. Yao received his master’s and doctoral degrees in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and his bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering at UD. As an undergraduate at UD, he was mentored by Ajay Prasad, Engineering Alumni Distinguished Professor and Chair of Engineering, who introduced him to electric cars and electrochemistry, and the science behind them.

Tags:  Batteries  Graphene  Koffi Pierre Yao  Li-ion Batteries  Lithium  University of Delaware 

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Graphene Sensors will be part of the International Space Station

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Friday, February 22, 2019
Updated: Friday, February 22, 2019

A new version of equipment developed in Brazil – the Solar-T –  will be sent to the International Space Station (ISS) to measure solar flares. It is estimated that the Sun-THz, the name given to the new photometric telescope, will be launched in 2022 on one of the missions to the ISS and will remain there to take consistent measurements.



The photometric telescope works at a frequency of 0.2 to 15 THz, which can only be measured from space. In parallel, another telescope, the HATS, will be installed in Argentina. That instrument, which will be ready in 2020, will work at a frequency of 15 THz on the ground. The HATS is being constructed as part of a Thematic Project led by Guillermo Giménez de Castro, a professor at the Mackenzie Radio Astronomy and Astrophysics Center (CRAAM) at Mackenzie Presbyterian University (UPM).

The equipment was part of the subject matter presented during the session given by Giménez de Castro at FAPESP Week London, February 11-12, 2019.

The researcher explained that solar explosions, or flares, are phenomena that occur on the Sun’s surface, causing high levels of radiation in outer space. 

The Sun THz is an enhanced version of the Solar-T, a double photometric telescope that was launched in 2016 by NASA in Antarctica in a stratospheric balloon that flew 12 days at an altitude of 40,000 m.     

The Solar-T captured the energy emitted by solar flares at two unprecedented frequencies: from 3 to 7 terahertz (THz) that correspond to a segment of far infrared radiation.

The Solar-T was designed and built in Brazil by researchers at CRAAM together with colleagues at the Center for Semiconductor Components at the University of Campinas (UNICAMP).

Development was possible thanks to a Thematic Project and a Regular Research Grant from FAPESP. The principal investigator for both was Pierre Kaufmann, a researcher at CRAAM and one of the pioneers of radioastronomy in Brazil, who died in 2017.

The new equipment, with Kaufmann as one of its creators, will be the product of a partnership with the Lebedev Physics Institute in Russia.  

“The idea now is to use a set of detectors to measure a full spectrum, from 0.2 THz to 15 THz,” Giménez de Castro told Agência FAPESP.

Most of the new photometric telescope will be built in Russia, but it will have parts made in Brazil, such as the equipment that will be used to calibrate the entire instrument.

“The technology and concept behind the telescope were developed here [in Brazil]. The Russians liked the idea and are reproducing it and adding more elements. We are working on the cutting edge of technology. Forty years ago, the cutting edge for what could be done was 100 gigahertz. With the results obtained over the years, we are seeking higher frequencies, and prospects for the future are good,” said the researcher. 

The future of the equipment lies in its graphene sensors. Highly sensitive to terahertz frequencies, graphene sensors are able to detect polarization and be adjusted electronically.  

Experiments in creating these detectors are currently underway at the Center for Advanced Graphene, Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology Research (MackGraphe) at Mackenzie Presbyterian University, a FAPESP-funded center.

The project also enjoys collaboration from the University of Glasgow, as part of the PhD work of Jordi Tuneu Serra, who is currently on a FAPESP-funded doctoral research internship abroad and who also attended FAPESP Week London.

Tags:  CRAAM  Graphene  Guillermo Giménez de Castro  Jordi Tuneu Serra  MackGraphe  Sensors 

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Graphene Commercialization Conference in Berlin

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Thursday, February 21, 2019

Like many advanced materials, there is a significant learning curve to advance promising lab results into real commercial products. This includes a learning experience from the manufacturer, for cost-effective high-volume production, and a learning experience for the end-user, to establish the value and utilization of this novel material.   

IDTechEx have been following the graphene market throughout this learning experience, and the 13th edition of their commercially focussed B2B graphene conference, Graphene & 2D Materials, will be held from 10 - 11 April 2019 in Berlin, Germany. 

Once again, The Graphene Council will be there to help educate stakeholders on the value that graphene enhanced materials deliver, as well as to publicly announce the launch of the Verified Graphene Producer program. 



During the previous 12 conferences, the attendees have heard from all the main market players and end-users, with key market announcements made and technical insights provided. As the market reaches a turning point, this becomes more significant as the headlines have greater global impact.   

This combined conference and exhibition stands at a crucial point in the history of the graphene market. As laid out in a previous article, attendees will hear many relevant talks including those from: BASF, Sixth Element, NanoXplore, Avanzare, Sixonia Tech, Mitsubishi Electric, Samsung, First Graphene, and many more.   

Below are some selected indicators that the hype is turning to commercial reality for graphene. This includes the breaking of the scale vs orders dilemma, notable use-cases as a heat spreader, polymer additive, corrosion resistant coating, or enhanced battery electrode, and the upturn in investment and acquisitions. The specific news and outcomes for these indicators have all been seen at this world leading conference series and will continue to be added into the 2019 events.

2D materials are a diverse family, the event will include presentations on graphene nanoplatelets, graphene oxide (GO), reduced graphene oxide (rGO), and CVD graphene films. This includes perspectives and advancements multiple sections of the current and future supply chain: 

Material manufacturing: Attendees will hear from both established manufacturers looking to scale-up proceedings and new entries. For example, this includes NanoXplore and their 10,000 tpa plant announcement and Sixonia Tech a German university spin-out company working on electrochemical exfoliation. 

Intermediary formation: suspensions, polymer masterbatches and more are the most useful form of graphene-based products for many end-users. Attendees will hear more about this important step throughout the presentations. For example, Avanzare will discuss masterbatches for the polymer composite industry and Sixth Element provide suspensions to form heat spreaders and coatings. 

Integration and end-use application: How the materials are used, and the potential applications are very diverse. The conference will cover this in many applications from the use in energy storage, to polymer additives, electronic devices, thermal interface materials, and more all in discussion. 

Material sourcing and market opportunities: Many graphite mining companies are moving downstream and investing heavily to make this market a success. First Graphene are one such example of a vertically integrated company that will be presenting. Similarly, large materials companies are partnering or positioning themselves to utilise graphene products. Delegates will hear detailed analysis and perspectives of this industry from numerous speakers including from the likes of BASF.

For more information, please visit. 

Tags:  Avanzare  BASF  CVD  First Graphene  Graphene  Mitsubishi Electric  NanoXplore  rGO  Samsung  Sixonia Tech  Sixth Element 

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Further gains from Talga high energy battery anode product

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Tuesday, February 19, 2019
Updated: Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Australian advanced materials technology company, Talga Resources is pleased to announce further test results from its high energy graphene silicon lithium ion ("Li-ion") battery anode product Talnode™-Si.



Following initial test results (Oct 2018) further optimisation of Talnode-Si, with up to 15% silicon loading, has been underway at Talga's battery material facility in the Maxwell Centre of Cambridge University, UK. Highlights of new half cell cycling test results include:

• ~70% higher reversible capacity (~600mAh/g) than commercial graphite (~350mAh/g)*

• Coulombic efficiency of 99.5% - 99.9% with first cycle efficiency ~ 91%

• Up to 94% reversible capacity (after >130 cycles in a range of silicon loadings)

Talga Managing Director, Mr Mark Thompson: "The rapid development of our natural graphite anode products for Li-ion batteries have been extraordinary and the continued positive market response to products under development, Talnode-Si and Talnode-X, as well as our flagship product, Talnode-C, support plans for scaling up of Talnode products as part of our vertically integrated business strategy."

Moving Forward

Talnode-Si consists of a mixture of silicon and graphene particles engineered by Talga to be suitable for existing Li-ion battery manufacturing equipment as a high performance, cost-effective and scalable replacement for standard graphite anode materials. Commercial samples are being prepared, under confidentiality and material transfer agreements, with delivery commencing end of February 2019. Recipients include some of the world's largest electronics companies.

Development continues under the Safevolt project, a part of the £246 million UK-funded Faraday program, with Talga partners Johnson Matthey, Cambridge University and TWI. Based on the encouraging test results to date the Company has opted to progress to full cell testing and optimisation of Talnode-Si. Progress on the other Faraday projects, "Scale-up" and "Sodium" is continuing according to plan and updates will be provided as the programs proceed through their individual project stages.

Tags:  batteries  Graphene  Li-ion batteries  Mark Thompson  Talga Resources 

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Is graphene the future of water filtration?

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Tuesday, February 19, 2019
Updated: Saturday, February 16, 2019

The National Graphene Institute (NGI) at The University of Manchester has signed an 18 month research project with LifeSaver, a UK-based manufacturer of portable and reusable water filtration systems.

The project will focus on developing graphene technology that can be used for enhanced water filtration, with the goal of creating a proprietary and patented, cutting-edge product capable of eliminating an even wider range of hazardous contaminants than currently removed by its existing high performance ultra-filtration process.

Graphene has emerged as a material with fantastic potential for water filtration and desalination in recent years, with researchers on graphene membranes at the NGI leading the way. Graphene was the first two-dimensional material ever discovered, it is also one of the strongest known natural materials in the world, while retaining high levels of flexibility, conductivity and filtration.

By incorporating graphene into its existing market leading water purification technology, LifeSaver hopes to reduce the sieve size of its hollow fibre filtration membrane from the current 15 nanometers (which effectively removes bacteria, microbial cysts and viruses) to about 1-3 nanometers. At that size, LifeSaver products could remove a much wider range of contaminants, such as heavy metals, pesticides, certain chemicals and potentially even nuclear radiation, from drinking water supplies.

“Making a graphene-based portable water filter was our dream, and this collaboration with LifeSaver will enable that dream to be a reality sooner than later,” said Professor Rahul Nair, who will lead the project at The University of Manchester. “This is a great example of a collaborative project where we are trying to combine two independently developed technologies into one, to enhance the quality and availability of drinking water for those who need it most.” 

Founded in the UK in 2007, LifeSaver came to life following back-to-back natural disasters: the Indian Ocean Tsunami and Hurricane Katrina to address the resulting need for access to clean drinking water. The first LifeSaver prototype was developed and became the world’s first portable water filter capable of removing the smallest known waterborne viruses. Since that time, LifeSaver has established itself as an effective and long-lasting solution to drinking water issues in the humanitarian sectors, and outdoor enthusiasts.

Tags:  Graphene  LifeSaver  National Graphene Institute  Rahul Nair  water purification 

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A new 'periodic table' for nanomaterials

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Monday, February 18, 2019

The approach was developed by Daniel Packwood of Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) and Taro Hitosugi of the Tokyo Institute of Technology. It involves connecting the chemical properties of molecules with the nanostructures that form as a result of their interaction. A machine learning technique generates data that is then used to develop a diagram that categorizes different molecules according to the nano-sized shapes they form. This approach could help materials scientists identify the appropriate molecules to use in order to synthesize target nanomaterials.

Fabricating nanomaterials using a bottom-up approach requires finding 'precursor molecules' that interact and align correctly with each other as they self-assemble. But it's been a major challenge knowing how precursor molecules will interact and what shapes they will form.

Bottom-up fabrication of graphene nanoribbons is receiving much attention due to their potential use in electronics, tissue engineering, construction, and bio-imaging. One way to synthesise them is by using bianthracene precursor molecules that have bromine 'functional' groups attached to them. The bromine groups interact with a copper substrate to form nano-sized chains. When these chains are heated, they turn into graphene nanoribbons.

Packwood and Hitosugi tested their simulator using this method for building graphene nanoribbons.

Data was input into the model about the chemical properties of a variety of molecules that can be attached to bianthracene to 'functionalize' it and facilitate its interaction with copper. The data went through a series of processes that ultimately led to the formation of a 'dendrogram'.

This showed that attaching hydrogen molecules to bianthracene led to the development of strong one-dimensional nano-chains. Fluorine, bromine, chlorine, amidogen, and vinyl functional groups led to the formation of moderately strong nano-chains. Trifluoromethyl and methyl functional groups led to the formation of weak one-dimensional islands of molecules, and hydroxide and aldehyde groups led to the formation of strong two-dimensional tile-shaped islands.

The information produced in the dendogram changed based on the temperature data provided. The above categories apply when the interactions are conducted at -73°C. The results changed with warmer temperatures. The researchers recommend applying the data at low temperatures where the effect of the functional groups' chemical properties on nano-shapes are most clear.

The technique can be applied to other substrates and precursor molecules. The researchers describe their method as analogous to the periodic table of chemical elements, which groups atoms based on how they bond to each other. "However, in order to truly prove that the dendrograms or other informatics-based approaches can be as valuable to materials science as the periodic table, we must incorporate them in a real bottom-up nanomaterial fabrication experiment," the researchers conclude in their study. "We are currently pursuing this direction in our laboratories."

Tags:  Daniel Packwood  Graphene  Graphene Nanoribbons  Kyoto University  nanomaterials  Taro Hitosugi  Tokyo Institute of Technology 

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Laser-induced graphene gets tough

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Monday, February 18, 2019
Updated: Monday, February 18, 2019
Laser-induced graphene (LIG), a flaky foam of the atom-thick carbon, has many interesting properties on its own but gains new powers as part of a composite.

The labs of Rice University chemist James Tour and Christopher Arnusch, a professor at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel, introduced a batch of LIG composites in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano that put the material’s capabilities into more robust packages.

By infusing LIG with plastic, rubber, cement, wax or other materials, the lab made composites with a wide range of possible applications. These new composites could be used in wearable electronics, in heat therapy, in water treatment, in anti-icing and deicing work, in creating antimicrobial surfaces and even in making resistive random-access memory devices.

The Tour lab first made LIG in 2014 when it used a commercial laser to burn the surface of a thin sheet of common plastic, polyimide. The laser’s heat turned a sliver of the material into flakes of interconnected graphene. The one-step process made much more of the material, and at far less expense, than through traditional chemical vapor deposition.

Since then, the Rice lab and others have expanded their investigation of LIG. Last year, the Rice researchers created graphene foam for sculpting 3D objects.

“LIG is a great material, but it’s not mechanically robust,” said Tour, who co-authored an overview of laser-induced graphene developments in the Accounts of Chemical Research journal last year. “You can bend it and flex it, but you can’t rub your hand across it. It’ll shear off. If you do what’s called a Scotch tape test on it, lots of it gets removed. But when you put it into a composite structure, it really toughens up.”

To make the composites, the researchers poured or hot-pressed a thin layer of the second material over LIG attached to polyimide. When the liquid hardened, they pulled the polyimide away from the back for reuse, leaving the embedded, connected graphene flakes behind.

Soft composites can be used for active electronics in flexible clothing, Tour said, while harder composites make excellent superhydrophobic (water-avoiding) materials. When a voltage is applied, the 20-micron-thick layer of LIG kills bacteria on the surface, making toughened versions of the material suitable for antibacterial applications.

Composites made with liquid additives are best at preserving LIG flakes’ connectivity. In the lab, they heated quickly and reliably when voltage was applied. That should give the material potential use as a deicing or anti-icing coating, as a flexible heating pad for treating injuries or in garments that heat up on demand.

“You just pour it in, and now you transfer all the beautiful aspects of LIG into a material that’s highly robust,” Tour said.

Rice graduate students Duy Xuan Luong and Kaichun Yang and former postdoctoral researcher Jongwon Yoon, now a senior researcher at the Korea Basic Science Institute, are co-lead authors of the paper. Co-authors are former Rice postdoctoral researcher Swatantra Singh, now at the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, and Rice graduate student Tuo Wang. Tour is the T.T. and W.F. Chao Chair in Chemistry as well as a professor of computer science and of materials science and nanoengineering at Rice.

The Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the United States-Israel Binational Science Foundation supported the research.

Tags:  Christopher Arnusch  Graphene  James Tour  Lasers  Rice University 

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Waterproof graphene electronic circuits

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Thursday, February 14, 2019
Updated: Thursday, February 14, 2019
Water molecules distort the electrical resistance of graphene, but a team of European researchers has discovered that when this two-dimensional material is integrated with the metal of a circuit, contact resistance is not impaired by humidity. This finding will help to develop new sensors –the interface between circuits and the real world– with a significant cost reduction.

The many applications of graphene, an atomically-thin sheet of carbon atoms with extraordinary conductivity and mechanical properties, include the manufacture of sensors. These transform environmental parameters into electrical signals that can be processed and measured with a computer.

Due to their two-dimensional structure, graphene-based sensors are extremely sensitive and promise good performance at low manufacturing cost in the next years.
To achieve this, graphene needs to make efficient electrical contacts when integrated with a conventional electronic circuit. Such proper contacts are crucial in any sensor and significantly affect its performance.

But a problem arises: graphene is sensitive to humidity, to the water molecules in the surrounding air that are adsorbed onto its surface. H2O molecules change the electrical resistance of this carbon material, which introduces a false signal into the sensor.

However, Swedish scientists have found that when graphene binds to the metal of electronic circuits, the contact resistance (the part of a material's total resistance due to imperfect contact at the interface) is not affected by moisture.

“This will make life easier for sensor designers, since they won't have to worry about humidity influencing the contacts, just the influence on the graphene itself,” explains Arne Quellmalz, a PhD student at KTH Royal Institute of Technology (Sweden) and the main researcher of the research.

The study, published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, has been carried out experimentally using graphene together with gold metallization and silica substrates in transmission line model test structures, as well as computer simulations.

“By combining graphene with conventional electronics, you can take advantage of both the unique properties of graphene and the low cost of conventional integrated circuits.” says Quellmalz, “One way of combining these two technologies is to place the graphene on top of finished electronics, rather than depositing the metal on top the graphene sheet.”

As part of the European CO2-DETECT project, the authors are applying this new approach to create the first prototypes of graphene-based sensors. More specifically, the purpose is to measure carbon dioxide (CO2), the main greenhouse gas, by means of optical detection of mid-infrared light and at lower costs than with other technologies.

Tags:  2D materials  Arne Quellmalz  Electronics  Graphene  KTH Royal Institute of Technology 

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Scientists Probe into the Effect of Graphene on Light-wave Interaction

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Wednesday, February 13, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, February 13, 2019
Two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials are helping facilitate nanostructure science. Their outstanding nonlinear optical properties like enhanced two-photon absorption and absorption saturation make new applications possible in laser technologies, optical computing and telecommunications. 

Nowadays, ongoing wave mixing studies in 2D materials mainly focus on harmonic generation. Four-wave mixing in near infrared was recently carried out on a graphene monolayer, and revealed a third-order nonlinear susceptibility χ(3) value, which is about 7 orders of magnitude larger than in bulk insulators like silica and BK7 glass, 3-5 orders larger than in bulk semiconductors like silicon, germanium, cadmium and zinc chalcogenides, metal oxides, and 10 times larger than in thin plasmonic gold films and nanoparticles.

Most recently, an even larger value was obtained in graphene nanoribbons at mid-infrared frequencies close to the transverse plasmon resonance. 

Despite these not yet abundant but impressive advances of phase conjugation in graphene, the effect of 2D materials on Stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) remains overlooked. Due to its fundamental importance in laser and fiber telecommunications, the effect currently attracts theoretical considerations concerning bulk and composite semiconductor materials, including practical designs. 

Recently, a collaborative study led by Prof. Dr. WANG Jun at Laboratory of Micro-Nano Optoelectronic Materials and Devices, Key Laboratory of Materials for High-Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, investigated the character of SBS of low-concentration graphene nanoparticle suspensions in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and water. 

They found a strong SBS quenching effect which was attributed to the interference of density gratings formed in the liquid by electrostriction and thermal expansion forces (see Fig. 1).

Established linear dependences of SBS threshold on graphene absorption coefficient (i.e., concentration) can be used for the detection of small nanomaterial quantities in liquid media down to 5×10-8g·cm-3. 

Computer simulations of the Brillouin gain factor show the efficiency of different thermodynamic, electrooptic and photoacoustic parameters in the SBS quenching. The role of density and compressibility, which change as a result of carbon vapor bubble formation, is found to be decisive in leading to dramatic changes of refractive index, electrostrictive and acoustic damping coefficients. 

The effect can give tools to bubble nanosecond dynamics studies and a method of SBS suppression in optical composites applicable in laser technologies and optical telecommunication networks. 

This study, entitled "Stimulated Brillouin scattering in dispersed graphene" has been published online in Optics Express on Dec. 18, 2018. 

This work was supported by the Chinese National Natural Science Foundation, the Strategic Priority Research Program of CAS, the Key Research Program of Frontier Science of CAS, the Program of Shanghai Academic Research Leader and President’s International Fellowship Initiative of CAS.  

Tags:  2D materials  Graphene 

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Haydale in Collaborative SMART Expertise Programme on Applications of Functionalised Micro & Nano Materials

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Haydale is pleased to announce that it is working alongside Swansea University, GTS Flexibles, Alliance Labels, Tectonic International, ScreenTec, Alliance Labels, Malvern Panalytical and the English Institute of Sport on a Welsh Government SMART Expertise Program. The programme, funded by the Welsh Government as part of its European Development Fund, is intended to benefit industry in Wales through the development of new concepts and advanced functionalised inks using Haydale’s advanced materials.

Combining expertise from across the consortium, the programme will see the creation of a product pipeline for the scale up to volume production of Applications of Functionalised Micro & Nano Materials, also known as the AFM2 Product Pipeline. This is designed to speed up the process required to take products from proof of concept into volume and profitable products. With a focus on market pull, the AFM2 Product Pipeline will turn a demand driven idea into a bench prototype followed by pilot production for market and customer evaluation.

The first examples to shape this pipeline development will be provided by the English Institute of Sport (EIS), Tectonic and GTS Flexibles, with an intention to generate a steady feed of new concepts into the pipeline to ensure its sustainability beyond the project.
 
As previously announced, Haydale, in collaboration with WCPC, has developed and refined a range of proprietary printing inks utilising its functionalised graphene for the development of advanced wearable technology to be embedded into a range of apparel for elite athletes in training for the 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games. The functionalised inks fulfil a range of functions in sensing and conditioning, combined with ease of printing for use in the rapidly growing wearable technology market. 
 
Professor Tim Claypole MBE, Director, the Welsh Centre for Printing and Coating, Swansea University, said: “This is a really exciting project which will take innovative concepts manufactured by printing of advanced functional materials and rapidly transitioned them from proof of concept into volume, profitable products. It will drive more applications for inks containing the unique functionalised nano carbons created by the Haydale Plasma Functionalisation process.”
 
Keith Broadbent, Haydale COO, said: “The close relationship with our colleagues at WCPC is now bearing fruit with a range of robust, stable, high performing functionalised inks and coatings emerging from extensive development work and finding applications in wearable technology, printed sensors and thermal management.”

Tags:  Alliance Labels  Graphene  GTS Flexibles  Haydale  Malvern Panalytical  ScreenTec  Swansea University  Tectonic International 

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