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Scientists create fully electronic 2-dimensional spin transistors

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Tuesday, October 15, 2019
Updated: Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Physicists from the University of Groningen constructed a two-dimensional spin transistor, in which spin currents were generated by an electric current through graphene. A monolayer of a transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) was placed on top of graphene to induce charge-to-spin conversion in the graphene. This experimental observation was described in the issue of the journal Nano Letters published on 11 September 2019.

Spintronics is an attractive alternative way of creating low-power electronic devices. It is not based on a charge current but on a current of electron spins. Spin is a quantum mechanical property of an electron, a magnetic moment that could be used to transfer or store information.

Heterostructure
Graphene, a 2D form of carbon, is an excellent spin transporter. However, in order to create or manipulate spins, interaction of its electrons with the atomic nuclei is needed: spin-orbit coupling. This interaction is very weak in carbon, making it difficult to generate or manipulate spin currents in graphene. However, it has been shown that spin-orbit coupling in graphene will increase when a monolayer of a material with heavier atoms (such as a TMD) is placed on top, creating a Van der Waals heterostructure.

In the Physics of Nanodevices group, led by Professor Bart van Wees at the University of Groningen, Ph.D. student Talieh Ghiasi and postdoctoral researcher Alexey Kaverzin created such a heterostructure. Using gold electrodes, they were able to send a pure charge current through the graphene and generate a spin current, referred to as the Rashba-Edelstein effect. This happens due to the interaction with the heavy atoms of the TMD monolayer (in this case, tungsten disulfide). This well-known effect was observed for the first time in graphene that was in proximity to other 2D materials.

Symmetries

'The charge current induces a spin current in the graphene, which we could measure with spin-selective ferromagnetic cobalt electrodes,' says Ghiasi. This charge-to-spin conversion makes it possible to build all-electrical spin circuits with graphene. Previously, the spins had to be injected through a ferromagnet. 'We have also shown that the efficiency of the generation of the spin accumulation can be tuned by the application of an electric field,' adds Ghiasi. This means that they have built a spin transistor in which the spin current can be switched on and off.

The Rashba-Edelstein effect is not the only effect that produces a spin current. The study shows that the Spin-Hall effect does the same, but that these spins are oriented differently. 'When we apply a magnetic field, we make the spins rotate in the field. Different symmetries of the spin signals generated by the two effects in interaction with the magnetic field help us to disentangle the contribution of each effect in one system,' explains Ghiasi. It was also the first time that both types of charge-to-spin conversion mechanisms were observed in the same system. 'This will help us to gain more fundamental insights into the nature of spin-orbit coupling in these heterostructures.'

Graphene Flagship

Apart from the fundamental insights that the study can provide, building an all-electrical 2D spin transistor (without ferromagnets) has considerable significance for spintronic applications, which is also a goal of the EU Graphene Flagship. 'This is especially true because we were able to see the effect at room temperature. The spin signal decreased with increasing temperature but was still very much present under ambient conditions.'

Tags:  2D materials  Bart van Wees  Graphene  Graphene Flagship  Talieh Ghiasi  transistor  University of Groningen 

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Smart Insole Can Double As Lifesaving Technology For Diabetic Patients

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Monday, October 14, 2019
Updated: Tuesday, October 15, 2019
Stevens Institute of Technology has signed an exclusive licensing agreement with Bonbouton, giving the cutting-edge health and technology company the right to use and further develop a graphene sensing system that detects early signs of foot ulcers before they form so people living with diabetes can access preventative healthcare and confidently manage their health.

The smart insole, Bonbouton’s first product, can be inserted into a sneaker or dress shoe to passively monitor the foot health of a person living with diabetes. The data are then sent to a companion app which can be accessed by the patient and shared with their healthcare provider, who can determine if intervention or treatment is needed.

“I was inspired by two things—a desire to help those with diabetes and a desire to commercialize the technology,” said Bonbouton Founder and CEO Linh Le, who developed and patented the core graphene technology while pursuing a doctorate in chemical engineering at Stevens. Le came up with the idea to create an insole that could help prevent diabetic ulcers after several personal incidents lead him to pursue preventative healthcare.

Complications from diabetes can make it difficult for patients to monitor their foot heath. Chronically high levels of blood glucose can impair blood vessels and cause nerve damage. Patients can experience a lot of pain, but can also lose feeling in their feet. Diabetes-related damage to blood vessels and nerves can lead to hard-to-treat infections such as ulcers. Ulcers that don’t heal can cause severe damage to tissues and bone and may require amputation of a toe, foot or part of a leg.

Bonbouton’s smart insoles sense the skin’s temperature, pressure and other foot health-related data, which can alert a patient and his or her healthcare provider when an infection is about to take hold. This simplifies patient self-monitoring and reduces the frequency of doctor visits, which can ultimately lead to a higher quality of life.

Bonbouton, which is based in New York City, is currently partnering with global insurance company MetLife to determine how its smart insoles will be able to reduce healthcare costs for diabetic foot amputations. In 2018, Bonbouton also announced its technical development agreement with Gore, a company well known for revolutionizing the outerwear industry with GORE-TEX® fabric, to explore ways to integrate Bonbouton’s graphene sensors in comfortable, wearable fabric for digital health applications, including disease management, athletic performance and everyday use.

“We are interested in developing smart clothing for preventative health, and embrace the possibilities of how our graphene technology can be used in other industries,” said Le. “I am excited to realize the full potential of Bonbouton, taking a technology that I developed as a graduate student at Stevens and growing it into a product that will bring seamless preventative care to patients and save billions of dollars in healthcare costs.”

Tags:  Bonbouton  Graphene  Healthcare  Linh Le  Sensors  Stevens Institute of Technology 

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Nano-enhanced Boots Successfully Passed Safety Tests

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Monday, October 14, 2019
Updated: Tuesday, October 15, 2019
First Graphene, in collaboration with Steel Blue, has successfully completed safety tests for graphene-enhanced boots which will be used in various industrial sectors. This is the first time that graphene has been used successfully in thermoplastic polyurethane masterbatch, which presents considerable benefits including improved wear and chemical resistance, enhanced heat transfer, and reduced permeability.

This is the first time that graphene has successfully been incorporated into a thermoplastic polyurethane masterbatch and offers considerable advantages, including even greater wear and chemical resistance, better thermal heat transfer and reduced permeability.

Steel Blue is a major global manufacturer of work boots, with a reputation for innovative design to improve comfort, durability and safety. The adoption of graphene to boost these features still further is a continuation of this philosophy, as Chief Executive Officer, Garry Johnson, explains, “Steel Blue is committed to developing innovative solutions for our customers. We’re excited by these recent developments with First Graphene and look forward to delivering these solutions to our market.”

The prototype boots have been manufactured using First Graphene’s PureGRAPH 10 graphene powder. Unlike competing formulations, this is available in high production volumes with non-aggregated, uniform sized graphene nanoplatelets; this ensures that it disperses evenly in thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) masterbatches.

The prototype boots incorporate PureGRAPH-infused TPU soles and polyurethane foam innersoles and will now undergo extensive laboratory testing, followed by field trials. Craig McGuckin, Managing Director for First Graphene said, “The development work with Steel Blue provides yet another example of how we’re working with customers to commercialise the development of graphene, to transform the properties of materials used in many different applications, from elastomers and composites, to concrete and specialised industrial coatings.”

Tags:  coatings  composites  Craig McGuckin  First Graphene  Garry Johnson  Graphene  graphene enhanced polymer  Steel Blue 

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UPDATE: NIOSH graphene occupational exposures study

Posted By Terrance Barkan, Wednesday, October 9, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, October 9, 2019

 

UPDATE NOTICE

 

NIOSH is continuing to seek U.S. graphene companies to participate in its exposure assessment study. We have just recently completed year one of our three-year exposure study at graphene producers and downstream users. The goal of the study is to visit 12-15 companies between now and September 2021 to conduct air sampling on workers handling graphene or graphene infused products.

 

Thus far, the NIOSH team has visited three companies and sampled 24 workers. All participating companies will receive a thorough industrial hygiene report that will detail potential exposure sources and recommendations for improved safety practices. 


Study Factsheet Download


We hope you consider participating in this study. Below is an introductory letter showing basic information about the study. Please contact Seth McCormick at OSR5@cdc.gov with any questions or interest in participating.

 

 

- Originally Posted in March 2019 -

 

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and has a mission to develop new knowledge in the field of occupational safety and health.

 

NIOSH is initiating a study, with the assistance of The Graphene Council, to assess occupational exposures to graphene and other Two-Dimensional nanomaterials in commercial and industrial applications within the United States.

 

Our findings will help inform interested parties on what a representative workplace exposure currently is for these materials and establish consensus air sampling methods that can be adopted by industry and used to improve workers’ short and long-term health outcomes.

 

NIOSH is inviting companies operating within the United States to participate in this research opportunity. Exposure sampling will occur over three to four sequential days at your convenience. Workers will wear personal air sampling pumps to assess exposures within their breathing zones. Multiple processes and locations will be assessed in this way to provide a facility-wide exposure assessment.

 

For participating, your company will receive a thorough industrial hygiene report. This includes exposure characterization for all employees and sampled processes as well as recommendations for controls and methods to reduce exposures specific to your company.

 

Matthew Dahm, PhD, MPH is an industrial hygienist and is the principle investigator of this study. Seth McCormick, MPH is an industrial hygienist who will be serving as the main point of contact for those interested in participating. Please review the attached introductory letter, factsheet, and short biographies at your convenience.

 

If you are interested in learning more about the study or participating, please contact Seth by phone or email at 513-841-4575 or SMcCormick@cdc.gov. We look forward to working with you to ensure the safest possible work environment for your employees.

 

Matthew M. Dahm, PhD, MPH                                                          Seth McCormick, MPH

Research Industrial Hygienist                                                             Research Industrial Hygienist

1090 Tusculum Ave, MS-R14                                                            1090 Tusculum Ave, MS-R14

Cincinnati, OH 45226                                                                         Cincinnati, OH 45226

 

Phone: 513-458-7136                                                                         Phone: 513-841-4575

Email: mdahm@cdc.gov                                                                    Email: SMcCormick@cdc.gov

 

Introductory Letter         Fact Sheet          Bios 

Tags:  Exposure  Graphene  Health and Safety  HSE  NIOSH 

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Talga develops anode technology under Innovate UK ‘Faraday’ Project

Posted By Terrance Barkan, Monday, October 7, 2019

Advanced battery anode materials and graphene additives provider Talga Resources Ltd (“Talga” or “the Company”) (ASX:TLG) has announced that its UK subsidiary, Talga Technologies Limited, has gained funding under the UK Government’s ISCF Faraday Battery Challenge (“Faraday”) initiative to develop Talga’s graphitic anode for solid state batteries.

Faraday represents a £246 million UK Government funding initiative for battery research, development and scale up of facilities to help create a new supply chain for battery production in the UK and income from battery technologies.

Introduction and Opportunity 

 Solid state batteries are an emerging form of rechargeable battery technology with potential to combine high energy and high power with improved safety. They work by using a solid state electrolyte made of polymer, ceramic or glass material instead of the (more flammable) liquid electrolyte of today’s lithium-ion (“Li-ion”) batteries.

A range of automotive manufacturers including Toyota, Volkswagen, Hyundai and BMW have declared their goal is to incorporate solid state batteries into their vehicles by 2025.

Other companies such as Dyson and Bosch are active in this space through various investments in start-ups. A report by IDTechEx predicts the solid-state battery market to be worth in excess of $4bn by 2026.

Talga Anode Product

While solid state batteries are theoretically capable of very high performance, in practice they can suffer a range of technical and commercial issues that have hindered development, particularly for larger scale applications such as electric vehicles (“EV’s”). None of the solid state batteries reported to date exceed all of the performance and economic requirements of today’s best Li-ion batteries in EV’s.

A major bottleneck of solid state development is the anode, where the use of metallic lithium can cause a range of issues leading to slower charge/discharge characteristics, safety issues both within the battery and in mass production, and higher cost.

Talga aims to overcome these issues with a new high capacity graphitic carbon composite anode, Talnode-E, designed to have multiple advantages including faster charge and higher power, easier processability, safer handling, highly scalable industrial manufacturing and lower costs.

Faraday Project

The Faraday project titled “Cathodes, Anodes, and Solid-state Electrolytes for Lithium Ion Batteries” (CASE LIBs) aims to address the industrial and fundamental challenges of solid state batteries by bringing together Talga’s innovative technology arm at Cambridge, UK with Johnson Matthey, a multinational speciality chemicals and sustainable technologies company, and Sheffield University one of UKs leading battery materials groups.

The consortium partners have secured significant funding support under the ‘Innovation’ aspect of Faraday, to support the
project. Talga shall receive a 70% reimbursement of its eligible costs, including salaries, consumables, equipment and contractor expenses.

Talga Managing Director, Mr Mark Thompson: “Securing this grant and partnerships with both commercial and R&D partners is another solid step in Talga’s advancements as a battery material and technology supplier. This new anode product, Talnode-E, joins our range of advanced battery materials designed to provide leverage to current and emerging battery technologies, delivering
ongoing opportunities for growth.

Again we are partnered with brand names in the battery supply chain, well funded and with access to state of the art facilities, having utilised our well-developed network of innovative energy storage technology and material companies from our technology centre in Cambridge,UK.

We are seeing increased customer demand for solid state batteries, and have attained nondisclosure agreements with leading electronic and automotive companies looking to test our anodes based on our 100% owned Swedish graphite supply.”

Next Steps

Now that the funding winners have been announced, joint development agreements between the consortium partners have been executed and project activities commenced, Talga will update the market at significant milestones and in conjunction with official newsflow from partners and the ISCF Faraday Battery Challenge and Innovate UK.

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CenoStar and XG Sciences Partner to Deliver Graphene-Enhanced Concrete

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Monday, October 7, 2019
Updated: Monday, September 30, 2019

XG Sciences, Inc., a market leader in the design and manufacture of graphene nanoplatelets and advanced materials containing graphene nanoplatelets, announced today the signing of a distribution agreement with CenoStar, a global provider of functional fillers. Under the agreement, CenoStar will leverage its knowledge and market channel in various end-use markets for cement additives in the distribution of XG Sciences’ XG Concrete™, an additive with demonstrated performance in extending lifetime and strength in cement through reduced moisture absorption, crack propagation and gas permeability while increasing resistance to acid attack and freeze-thaw performance.  XG Concrete is another example of XG Sciences’ graphene nanoplatelets bringing advanced material design to a large global market. 

First isolated and characterized in 2004, graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms configured in an atomic-scale honeycomb lattice. Among many noted properties, monolayer graphene is harder than diamonds, lighter than steel but significantly stronger, and conducts electricity better than copper. Graphene nanoplatelets are particles consisting of multiple layers of graphene. Graphene nanoplatelets have unique capabilities for energy storage, thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, barrier properties, lubricity and the ability to impart physical property improvements when incorporated into plastics, metals or other matrices.

“Commercial demand for graphene is growing rapidly. This agreement allows both parties to leverage their strengths and bring improved performance to new and existing applications in the cement market – it’s an ideal combination of complimentary capabilities. XG Sciences brings advanced materials expertise through its graphene nanoplatelet technology and their use in XG Concrete, delivering improved performance and ease of adoption in cementitious applications. CenoStar brings in-depth expertise in understanding the needs of the concrete industry. We can advise our customers how to best leverage the performance of XG Concrete in meeting their unique performance requirements and deliver a better product to their end users,” said Roger Foster, CEO, CenoStar.

“We are pleased to announce this relationship,” said Bamidele Ali, Chief Commercial Officer. “CenoStar has extensive know-how in the concrete market and is well positioned to help their customers leverage the power of graphene to deliver on improved performance in important end-use markets.”

Tags:  Bamidele Ali  CenoStar  Concrete  Graphene  Roger Foster  XG Sciences 

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Scientists Realize High Performance Broadband Graphene Saturable Absorber

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Sunday, October 6, 2019
The unique mechanical, chemical, electronic and photonic features of graphene are attracting much attention, especially its unusual nonlinear optical (NLO) properties, making it a progressive solution to ultrafast saturable absorption and optical limiting. However, small NLO coefficient in natural materials restricts its applications due to high-intensity thresholds. Embedding NLO materials in a photonic crystal (PC) can yield lower NLO thresholds than bulk materials, making it an exciting NLO device again.

Recently, a study led by Prof. WANG Jun from Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences proposed a simple and accessible technology for PC manufacturing and presented a PC1 designed for infrared and visible λ pairs, which is suitable for the two harmonics of a standard laser source. The result was published in Optics Letters.

Their study was based on the polymer dispersion of graphene flakes. To prepare the crystal, graphene was first suspended using the liquid phase exfoliation method. Then the 1D PCs consisting 12 alternating layers of poly(9-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) and of graphene-based poly(vinyl-alcohol) (PVA) nanocomposite was spin coated on a glass substrate.

In order to compare the NLO response of graphene in PC with partially resonant and non-resonant cases, PC2 crystal and a pure PVA-G film were fabricated. In PC1 structure, two bandgaps near 515 nm and 1030 nm were observed. For PC2, the second bandgap fell on 1425 nm, which deprived the possible advantage at 1030 nm.

NLO properties of the three samples were studied using an open-aperture Z-scan setup with 340 fs pulses at the main and second harmonics of a fiber laser. More pronounced saturable behavior with significant enhancement of the nonlinear absorption coefficient and the imaginary part of the third-order nonlinear susceptibility was obtained in the PC structures as compared to the bulk PVA-G film.

Their experiment also showed a remarkable decrease of saturable absorption threshold and saturation intensities of graphene embedded in the PC in comparison with the bulk PVA-G. The saturable absorption enhancement factor reached 7 in the visible and 8 in the infrared, which could be explained by the combination of light field enhancement and absorptive and scattering losses inside the structures.

This work provides a desirable solution for an advanced all-optical laser mode-locking device. This work was supported by the Chinese National Natural Science Foundation, the Strategic Priority Research Program of CAS, the Key Research Program of Frontier Science of CAS, and the Program of Shanghai Academic Research Leader.

Tags:  Graphene  Jun Wang  optoelectronics  Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics 

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Thomas Skordas: "Graphene is on the way to changing our lives"

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Wednesday, October 2, 2019
Thomas Skordas, Director for Digital Excellence and Science Infrastructure, takes a look at the latest developments in graphene research on the occasion of Graphene Week 2019 – Europe's leading graphene conference, which brings together the latest innovations, leading-edge technology and research on graphene and other layered materials.

Graphene Week was a chance to hear about recent scientific discoveries and technological advances in graphene, one of the key technology areas in Europe today. The great strength of the Graphene Flagship is that it provides a nurturing environment for top scientists, researchers and industry to discover new uses for this fascinating material, which consists of a single layer of carbon atoms.

This year alone, the Flagship has scored some significant achievements. For example, it has used graphene to increase the lifetime of Perovskite solar cells, the most efficient way of converting sunlight to energy in existence, when facing conditions such as heat and moisture. Once they are commercially viable, they could be a game changer for the clean energy transition. Flagship researchers have also built silicon-graphene coin cell batteries, of which a high proportion of the components can be recycled. This patented technology forms the basis of the spin-off Bedimensional, which received a private investment of €18 million in 2018, and test production is expected to start in the coming months.

Graphene has the potential to change our lives, and we are witnessing more and more graphene product launches and spin-offs. The Flagship also regularly presents new demonstrators at events, such as the mobile phone-related technology shown at Mobile World Congress: this video shows what they presented. We are also looking forward to the publication in the next few weeks of a 400-page open-access book, the work of 70 co-authors, with information on how to produce graphene and up to 5000 other layered materials. It will be a “bible” for students and industrial manufacturers interested in the fabrication processes of these materials. We have come a long way: merely fifteen years ago, graphene was isolated for the first time ever, in pioneering experiments using pieces of Scotch tape, but today the methods for synthesising thousands of similar materials are available to anyone in the world.

Tags:  Batteries  Digital Excellence and Science Infrastructure  Graphene  Graphene Flagship  Thomas Skordas 

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Graphmatech’s Latest Invention Brings Metal Additive Manufacturing to the Next Level

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Thursday, September 26, 2019
Additive manufacturing (AM) or “3D-printing” is a manufacturing technology which allows the formation of complex geometries under computer control. Flowability of metal powder is among the challenges in metals AM industry. Graphmatech, a Swedish graphene materials technology scaleup company focuses on solving industrial challenges with graphene technology, have breaking news to share. Graphmatech scientists recently achieved remarkable improvement in the flowability of metal powders. This is another milestone in the success story of Graphmatech AB (founded 2017) that began with the patented technology and material Aros Graphene®. Strategic collaborations with Swedish, Swiss and German key industries, lead to that Graphmatech was appointed the “Nanotech company of the year in the Nordics” in 2018.

The latest story, on 3D printing enhancements, is best told by Dr. Mamoun Taher, the CEO, and co-founder of Graphmatech:

”Being a CEO of the fast-growing Graphmatech has never stopped me from being at the lab doing innovative and outside of the box experiments. One late afternoon, I went to the lab with an intention to investigate the influence of a graphene-based material on the magnetic properties of metal powders. Unexpected behavior of metal powder was observed after treatment with the graphene-based additive. The dreams about the observations woke me up very early the next morning and made me drive to Uppsala University to microscopically investigate the results from last night.

The results were immediately discussed with our collaborator at Uppsala University, Prof. Ulf Jansson, a Chair Professor, Inorganic Chemistry program leader and the leader for Additive Manufacturing Program at Uppsala University in Sweden.”

”When I saw the samples and results I immediately told Dr. Taher that this has the potential to solve a major challenge in metal powder industry and mainly for metal additive manufacturing. And this then turned out to be right! The newly found multifunctionality of the graphene-based additive allows the simultaneous addressing of different challenges in metal powder industry, and we are eager to continue our research” Says Prof. Ulf Jansson.

Further research and development have been carried out between Graphmatech and the group of Prof. Jansson to optimize and develop an eco-friendly, cost-efficient and scaleable process for treating metal powder with graphene-based materials for additive manufacturing and powder metallurgy.

Graphmatech was founded by material scientist Dr. Mamoun Taher and the serial entrepreneur Björn Lindh. The major investors of the company are ABB Technology Venture, InnoEnergy and the well-known business angel Jane Walerud.

Tags:  3D Printing  Björn Lindh  Graphene  Graphmatech  InnoEnergy  Jane Walerud  Mamoun Taher  Ulf Jansson  Uppsala University 

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Graphene is wonderful – The Graphene Flagship project presents innovations in Brussels

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Thursday, September 26, 2019
European Commission funded research project, the Graphene Flagship, will demonstrate a selection of the project’s most exciting innovations at the Science is Wonderful exhibition in Brussels, Belgium, on 25 and 26 September 2019. The free exhibition, held at Tour & Taxis, a redeveloped industrial space in Brussels, is part of the European Research and Innovation Days and aims to bring a world of science and technology to the general public.

Demonstrations from the Graphene Flagship include technology that has been developed for human health and wellbeing. For example, a graphene-based brain implant that could be used to provide information on the onset of seizures. The new technology, which has been developed by Graphene Flagship partners the Microelectronic Institute of Barcelona (IMB-CNM, CSIC), the Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2) and ICFO, demonstrates a major step in understanding the functions of the human brain.

The exhibition will also showcase examples of graphene dispersions and graphite electrodes manufactured by Graphene Flagship partner Talga. As a high-tech materials company and a leader in bulk graphene and graphite supply, Talga will demonstrate how graphene can easily be exfoliated from graphite, illustrating the journey from material exfoliation, right through to commercialisation.

Other demonstrations at Science is Wonderful include a newly developed virtual reality (VR) system which can be used to construct, manipulate and build graphene and other layered material structures. Developed by Graphene Flagship partner the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), the VR system demonstrates clearly how graphene can be modified and manipulated, with the ability to edit molecules and perform calculations on their electronic properties in real-time.

The VR system gives students and other citizens an unforgettable, low-barrier to entry for the complex machinery of atomic-scale materials and technology. However, it can also provide even experienced researchers with a unique sandbox for scientific problem solving, quantitative analysis, idea generation and discovery.

“The Graphene Flagship’s presence at Science is Wonderful will bolster its efforts to promote the use of graphene in commercial products,” explained Jari Kinaret, director of the Graphene Flagship. “During the first five years of our ambitious Graphene Flagship project, we managed to bring together academic researchers and industrial business leaders to create and commercialise technologies that are already improving European society — the demonstrations at Science is Wonderful will showcase some beautiful examples.”

Tags:  CSIC  Graphene  Graphene Flagship  Healthcare  ICFO  ICN2  Jari Kinaret  Technical University of Denmark 

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