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Haydale Awarded Funding to Develop Non-Metallic Gas Tanks for Spacecraft Propulsion Systems

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Wednesday, September 11, 2019
Updated: Thursday, September 5, 2019

Haydale has been awarded a technology de-risking project by the European Space Agency (ESA), to develop non-metallic gas tanks for spacecraft propulsion systems. This activity is alongside ISP International Space Propulsion Ltd through the ESA ARTES Competitiveness & Growth, in conjunction with UK Space Agency.

The recent market growth of small spacecraft constellations has created a challenge within the existing space propulsion supply chain for low-cost reliable components, which meet the rapid delivery schedule and support the on-going reduction of orbital debris. With the constellation market set to increase rapidly, the development of components that meet these criteria is critical. Haydale’s non-metallic system offers a low-cost alternative with reduced lead time that can be offered in a wider range of configurations to exactly suit the end user requirement.



This award follows on from the successful outcome of the GSTP project in 2018 performed with ESA and the UK Space Agency (UKSA) entitled “Assessments to Prepare and De-Risk Technology Developments - Tank using Advanced Composites.” This latest project will see Haydale develop findings from the GSTP project, performing comprehensive tests to determine the best material and process for developing non-metallic gas tanks.

Upon careful consideration and selection of both material and process, Haydale will formulate and model a largely de-risked tank, prior to the manufacture of development models for full testing. This will result in the qualification for specific Spacecraft Propulsion Systems. 

The role of this equipment is to store pressurised gas in a location onboard the spacecraft platform, in a manner that is intrinsically safe, and offers reliable provision of stored media, as and when required by the system. Within this equipment, the product will offer; leak-free storage and delivery on demand of all propellant and pressurised gases stored within, under specified environmental conditions and expected transient load cases; high pressure storage capabilities, with required levels of safety and reliability; highly reliable connections to the feed system and mechanical mounting; 

Prominent producers of Satellite technology have been identified and are engaged in developing the specification and tank design for eventual manufacture and deployment.

Keith Broadbent, CEO, Haydale, said: “This funding will allow Haydale to develop existing knowledge in the space industry and we look forward to developing the technology alongside our partners. We are pleased to have gained the support of the Airbus DS Tank Product Group who are interested in the development of competitive non-conventional pressure vessel products, and can provide clear design drivers thanks to their invaluable expertise. With the UK space market growing, Haydale is delighted to be part of this progression.”

Tags:  Aerospace  Airbus  Graphene  Haydale  Keith Broadbent 

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World’s First Graphene Skinned Plane

Posted By Terrance Barkan, Monday, August 13, 2018

 

 

The University of Central Lancashire (UCLAN) made an announcement about the recent unveiling of the world’s first graphene skinned plane at the internationally renowned Farnborough air show.

 

Haydale, (AIM: HAYD), the global advanced materials group, has supplied graphene enhanced prepreg material for Juno, a three-metre wide graphene-enhanced composite skinned aircraft, that was revealed as part of the ‘Futures Day’ at Farnborough Air Show 2018.

 

The prepreg material, developed by Haydale, has potential value for fuselage and wing surfaces in larger scale aero and space applications especially for the rapidly expanding drone market and, in the longer term, the commercial aerospace sector. By incorporating functionalised nanoparticles into epoxy resins, the electrical conductivity of fibre-reinforced composites has been significantly improved for lightning-strike protection, thereby achieving substantial weight saving and removing some manufacturing complexities. 

 

The Juno project, led by UCLAN, has been an ideal demonstration for the viability of the prepreg material for structural applications and the ability to manufacture components using traditional composite manufacturing methods. Further developments are underway to produce the next iteration of lightning strike protection materials based on these nano-carbon enhanced prepregs.

 

This technology also has performance benefits for a wide range of applications and industries including large offshore wind turbines, marine, oil and gas, and electronics and control systems.

 

Haydale worked with the aerospace engineering team at University of Central Lancashire, Sheffield Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre and the University of Manchester’s National Graphene Institute to develop the unmanned aerial vehicle, that also includes graphene batteries and 3D printed parts.

 

Ray Gibbs, Haydale CEO, said: “We are delighted to be part of the project team. Juno has highlighted the capability and benefit of using graphene properly dispersed into composite materials to meet key issues faced by the market, such as reducing weight to increase range, defeating lightning strike and protecting aircraft skins against ice build-up.”

 

David Banks, Haydale Chairman, said: “The unveiling of this plane shows how the use of graphene can offer great benefit to the aerospace industry, highlighting the potential near term commercial impact of graphene within this significant market.”

Tags:  Aerospace  composite  functionalized graphene  Haydale  Juno  Prepreg  UCLAN  University of Central Lancashire 

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