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Join the Graphene Flagship Core 3 Project

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Friday, May 10, 2019



The Graphene Flagship is looking for new partners to bring specific industrial and technology transfer competences or capabilities that complement the present consortium in the next core project. 

We are seeking partners with the following expertise:

  • MRAM tools developer to leverage solutions for GRM-spintronic stacks
  • Exposure and risk assessment of GRMs for occupational health
  • Clinical translation of GRM-based therapeutic medical devices for the central nervous system
  • Component manufacturer for GRM-based networking devices and interconnects 
  • Developer of GRM-based laser systems and instrumentation for coherent Raman imaging
  • Manufacturing and modification of GRM-based fibres, yarns and textiles
  • Automotive company with expertise in development of fuel cells for cars
  • Industrial GRM-based supercapacitors manufacturer
  • Manufacturer of GRM-based anticorrosion coatings
  • Developer of GRM-based pressure sensors for health monitoring in automotive applications
  • Manufacturer to deliver a ready-to-reach-the-market sports car with enhanced functionalities based on GRM/Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer composites
  • GRM-based composites manufacturer
  • Preparation of large GRM-based multifunctional pipes by filament winding
  • Formulation of low viscosity epoxy resins incorporating GRMs for aerostructures manufactured by infusion technologies


The selected new partners will be incorporated in the scientific and technological Work Packages of the third Core Project under the Horizon 2020 phase of the Graphene Flagship that will run during 1 April 2020 – 31 March 2023.

The addition of new partners to the Graphene Flagship consortium is subject to the approval of the required contract amendment by the Graphene Flagship General Assembly and, at a later stage, the European Commission.

Tags:  Graphene  Graphene Flagship 

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Exploring the Graphene Flagship through the eyes of a Nobel Prize winner

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Tuesday, April 2, 2019
Updated: Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Talking with SciTech Europa, Professor Novoselov, who was co-awarded the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics, for the discovery and isolation of a single atomic layer of carbon for the first time, explores the research into Graphene Flagship and other 2D materials.

At the University of Manchester, UK, in 2004, Professor Sir Kostya Novoselov, along with his colleague Professor Sir Andre Geim, discovered and isolated a single atomic layer of carbon for the first time. The pair received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2010 in recognition of their breakthrough.

On 28 January 2013, the European Commission announced that, out of the six pilot preparatory actions put forwards for the Future and Emerging Technology (FET) Flagships competition, the Graphene Flagship, along with the Human Brain Project, had been selected to receive €1bn in funding over the course of a decade, tasking it with bringing together academic and industrial researchers to take graphene from the realm of academic laboratories into European society, thereby generating economic growth, new jobs, and new opportunities.

In February, SciTech Europa attended the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain. This event is the world’s largest exhibition for the mobile industry, and where, for the fourth consecutive year, the Graphene Flagship hosted its Graphene Pavilion – this year showcasing over 20 different graphene-based working prototypes and devices that will transform future telecommunications.

At the pavilion, SEQ met with Professor Novoselov to discuss research into graphene and other two dimensional materials, as well as how the Flagship is working to bolster both fundamental research and applications stemming from these advanced materials.

Q. What do you think have been the biggest, and latest, developments in graphene (and other 2D materials) research?

There has been a lot of progress in recent years and, indeed, we are no longer talking only about graphene, but also about many other two dimensional materials as well.

First of all – new applications of graphene is one example of recent developments – we see new applications emerging on an almost monthly basis. Second, there is still a lot of progress being made in fundamental research on graphene and 2D materials. And those fundamental results are being implemented in applications.

In terms of other new 2D materials, there is a lot of activity on ferromagnetic materials.

Q. What potential is there now to move graphene forwards, and how would you describe the role of the Flagship in this?

The basic technology is in place, and so what is important now is for entrepreneurs and SMEs to convert those developments into commercial applications, and, indeed, we need to help them to do so.

The Flagship, of course, has now reached the half way stage, and we therefore need to carefully balance the amount of effort we place on applications with the effort we place on the development of fundamental science, which remains crucial.

Nevertheless, we also need to ensure we are helping companies and industry to introduce this material into real products, and that is actually much more difficult, not least because of the fact that this has not been done at this scale before, and so nobody knows how to do it yet.

Q. Are you able to utilise EU instruments to help fund commercialisation activities?

It is not necessarily funding that is a problem in in Europe; the challenge comes more in the form of bringing together scientists, entrepreneurs, and funders in the same room, and it is still not clear how to achieve that. There is thus the argument that we need to work more closely with entrepreneurs and we need to grow those entrepreneurs who are working on advanced materials because this is a much more challenging area than, say, ‘.com’ applications.

Q. What do you feel are the biggest barriers here?

It is perhaps the mentality that exists around risk taking that needs to change. Bringing together entrepreneurs, scientists, the technology and the money around the same table is a challenge and, as I have mentioned, it needs to be understood that bringing new materials, especially nanomaterials, to market is much more challenging than it is to bring, for example, new software to consumers. And, of course, the level of required investment is also much larger. Whether we have enough people in Europe who are ready to take this risk is a good question.

Q. Would you say that Europe is too risk averse when it comes to this type of investment in comparison to, for instance, the USA?

Perhaps; there is certainly a sense that Europe needs to work much harder than the USA or South-East Asia. And the reason for that is not only a lack of those willing to take enhanced risks, but also the level and mobility of the available money and, indeed, how soon financiers expect a return on their investment.

Q. Could 2D materials research spark a ‘revolution’ in real world applications?

I am not sure that we will see a ‘revolution’; the growth in real world applications utilising graphene is, and will continue to be, a gradual introduction. That is not to say, however, that this gradual process won’t speed up a little over time. And it is great to see that, when it comes to graphene, this introduction, although gradual, is already happening much faster than with any other advanced material that we have seen before. The purpose of the Flagship is to help speed up this process.

The Flagship is now investing in research into the safety of graphene. How important is that?
This is an example of the sort of issue where the Flagship should take the initiative, because it is not only about graphene; we need to realise that many new nanomaterials are going to play an increasing role in the everyday lives of people, and we need to be prepared for that.

There are a great many regulations which have to be passed when bringing such advanced materials to market, including health and safety and toxicology regulations, and very often these are not very well defined because, quite simply, we have never been in this situation before. It can also be quite expensive to run the necessary projects to investigate things like toxicology, and so it is important for projects like the Flagship to take the initiative and help businesses to overcome these barriers.

Q. Where are your own research interests going to lie, moving forwards?

I do indeed conduct my own research, and within that graphene is not the largest part. I go beyond graphene and work on many other 2D materials and heterostructures, but it is nevertheless exciting to remember that it was graphene that made all the other materials possible as we work on those heterostructures towards new discoveries.

Tags:  2D materials  Graphene  Graphene Flagship  Kostya Novoselov  University of Manchester 

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How is graphene holding up at Warsaw University of Technology?

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Tuesday, March 26, 2019
Updated: Tuesday, March 26, 2019

Warsaw University of Technology (“WUT”), for more than 10 years, has been involved in extensive research into graphene, its applications and production techniques, in both domestic and international projects (it boasts more than 250 scientific publications in international journals and several patents). As the only institution of higher education in Poland, it is a member of the Graphene Flagship programme, the EU’s biggest ever research initiative. The project work is carried out among others in the cutting-edge Center for Advanced Materials and Technologies (CEZAMAT) and is scheduled to continue until at least March 2022.

The University cooperates with scientific and industrial partners from Sweden, the United Kingdom, Austria and China to further advance the technology of epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide for applications such as 5G technologies. WUT’s PhD students engage in joint research at scientific institutions across Europe, including Cambridge and Madrid.

WUT pursues a number of high-end national projects that focus on research into graphene and new two-dimensional materials: Team-Tech (Foundation for Polish Science), Lider and TechmatStrateg (National Centre for Research and Development), Sonata and Preludium (National Science Centre), Diamentowy Grant (Ministry of Science and Higher Education).

The University has established the Graphene Laboratory (Faculty of Chemistry and Process Engineering) dedicated to the carbon nanomaterial production, characterization and exploration of new applications, e.g. hybrid fluorescent materials or infrared radiation absorbers or even some unusual solutions such as the development of new polyester gelcoats to be used in the construction of new generation yachts, Delphia Nano Solution. It is also a promoter of spin-offs aimed at the transfer of graphene technologies and applications to industry and putting them to use for commercial production. Moreover, numerous businesses collaborate with Warsaw University of Technology in application research under joint projects and bilateral agreements.

The work on graphene at Warsaw University of Technology covers two types of this material: graphene flakes and epitaxial graphene (film). “The University has several processing lines producing graphene flakes with the use of both chemical methods of oxidation and reduction of graphene oxide and the so-called liquid-phase direct exfoliation method. Last year, a new method was launched for the production of graphene flakes which is cheap, green and easily scalable for industry. WUT is now in the process of patenting this new technology,” says Prof. Mariusz Zdrojek, head of the graphene research group at  WUT’s Faculty of Physics.

The University has also launched an epitaxial graphene growth (on copper foil) for the purpose of its own application research. Moreover, it has developed and launched the growth technique of new two-dimensional materials in the graphene family, MXenes. The synthesis of other two-dimensional materials, i.e. molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), using the epitaxial growth method has also been elaborated.

Some of the more exciting graphene applications developed by the Warsaw University of Technology in collaboration with the Polish industry include:

- New generation ultrafast infrared photodetector created in 2015 under the Graf-Tech project. The device, in which graphene plays a key role, is in the pre-implementation phase (Faculty of Physics);

- Electronic nanodevices to be used in high-frequency electronics (for fast detectors, sensors or diodes), a product of the Lider project. Currently, work is underway on the patent application (Faculty of Physics);

- New nanocomposites for electromagnetic radiation protection for cybersecurity, electronics, aerospace and 5G technology. The patent application is pending with the European Patent Office (Faculty of Physics);

- Graphene thermal pastes for electronics as novel materials for heat transfer. Conductive graphene inks and pastes suitable for multi-surface printing technologies (e.g. clothes or banknote printing), where they act as transparent electrodes. Patented technology (Faculty of Mechatronics);

- Membrane technologies for mobile drinking water treatment plants, where use of graphene has improved selectivity. (Faculty of - Material Science and Engineering; Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering);

- Graphene as an anti-corrosion coating, a product of the GrafTech project as part of the joint effort with a research partner (Faculty of Physics);

- other, i.e. flexible displays, pressure sensors, glucose sensors or amino acid biosensors.

For the past few years WUT’s researchers have been also conducting research into the application of other 2D materials. This  has resulted in creation of the materials’ potential new applications eg in the production of composites for the space and aerospace industries or as an innovative platform for drug delivery, new optoelectronic nanodevices or devices for terahertz electronics applications.

With the appropriate know-how, materials and infrastructure and access to the country’s best specialists,  Warsaw University of Technology remains at the leading edge of the development of technologies and applications for other two-dimensional materials, considered to be of strategic importance to advanced industry sectors.

Tags:  2D materials  Graphene  Graphene Flagship  Mariusz Zdrojek  Warsaw University of Technology 

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