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Smart Insole Can Double As Lifesaving Technology For Diabetic Patients

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Monday, October 14, 2019
Updated: Tuesday, October 15, 2019
Stevens Institute of Technology has signed an exclusive licensing agreement with Bonbouton, giving the cutting-edge health and technology company the right to use and further develop a graphene sensing system that detects early signs of foot ulcers before they form so people living with diabetes can access preventative healthcare and confidently manage their health.

The smart insole, Bonbouton’s first product, can be inserted into a sneaker or dress shoe to passively monitor the foot health of a person living with diabetes. The data are then sent to a companion app which can be accessed by the patient and shared with their healthcare provider, who can determine if intervention or treatment is needed.

“I was inspired by two things—a desire to help those with diabetes and a desire to commercialize the technology,” said Bonbouton Founder and CEO Linh Le, who developed and patented the core graphene technology while pursuing a doctorate in chemical engineering at Stevens. Le came up with the idea to create an insole that could help prevent diabetic ulcers after several personal incidents lead him to pursue preventative healthcare.

Complications from diabetes can make it difficult for patients to monitor their foot heath. Chronically high levels of blood glucose can impair blood vessels and cause nerve damage. Patients can experience a lot of pain, but can also lose feeling in their feet. Diabetes-related damage to blood vessels and nerves can lead to hard-to-treat infections such as ulcers. Ulcers that don’t heal can cause severe damage to tissues and bone and may require amputation of a toe, foot or part of a leg.

Bonbouton’s smart insoles sense the skin’s temperature, pressure and other foot health-related data, which can alert a patient and his or her healthcare provider when an infection is about to take hold. This simplifies patient self-monitoring and reduces the frequency of doctor visits, which can ultimately lead to a higher quality of life.

Bonbouton, which is based in New York City, is currently partnering with global insurance company MetLife to determine how its smart insoles will be able to reduce healthcare costs for diabetic foot amputations. In 2018, Bonbouton also announced its technical development agreement with Gore, a company well known for revolutionizing the outerwear industry with GORE-TEX® fabric, to explore ways to integrate Bonbouton’s graphene sensors in comfortable, wearable fabric for digital health applications, including disease management, athletic performance and everyday use.

“We are interested in developing smart clothing for preventative health, and embrace the possibilities of how our graphene technology can be used in other industries,” said Le. “I am excited to realize the full potential of Bonbouton, taking a technology that I developed as a graduate student at Stevens and growing it into a product that will bring seamless preventative care to patients and save billions of dollars in healthcare costs.”

Tags:  Bonbouton  Graphene  Healthcare  Linh Le  Sensors  Stevens Institute of Technology 

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Graphene is wonderful – The Graphene Flagship project presents innovations in Brussels

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Thursday, September 26, 2019
European Commission funded research project, the Graphene Flagship, will demonstrate a selection of the project’s most exciting innovations at the Science is Wonderful exhibition in Brussels, Belgium, on 25 and 26 September 2019. The free exhibition, held at Tour & Taxis, a redeveloped industrial space in Brussels, is part of the European Research and Innovation Days and aims to bring a world of science and technology to the general public.

Demonstrations from the Graphene Flagship include technology that has been developed for human health and wellbeing. For example, a graphene-based brain implant that could be used to provide information on the onset of seizures. The new technology, which has been developed by Graphene Flagship partners the Microelectronic Institute of Barcelona (IMB-CNM, CSIC), the Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2) and ICFO, demonstrates a major step in understanding the functions of the human brain.

The exhibition will also showcase examples of graphene dispersions and graphite electrodes manufactured by Graphene Flagship partner Talga. As a high-tech materials company and a leader in bulk graphene and graphite supply, Talga will demonstrate how graphene can easily be exfoliated from graphite, illustrating the journey from material exfoliation, right through to commercialisation.

Other demonstrations at Science is Wonderful include a newly developed virtual reality (VR) system which can be used to construct, manipulate and build graphene and other layered material structures. Developed by Graphene Flagship partner the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), the VR system demonstrates clearly how graphene can be modified and manipulated, with the ability to edit molecules and perform calculations on their electronic properties in real-time.

The VR system gives students and other citizens an unforgettable, low-barrier to entry for the complex machinery of atomic-scale materials and technology. However, it can also provide even experienced researchers with a unique sandbox for scientific problem solving, quantitative analysis, idea generation and discovery.

“The Graphene Flagship’s presence at Science is Wonderful will bolster its efforts to promote the use of graphene in commercial products,” explained Jari Kinaret, director of the Graphene Flagship. “During the first five years of our ambitious Graphene Flagship project, we managed to bring together academic researchers and industrial business leaders to create and commercialise technologies that are already improving European society — the demonstrations at Science is Wonderful will showcase some beautiful examples.”

Tags:  CSIC  Graphene  Graphene Flagship  Healthcare  ICFO  ICN2  Jari Kinaret  Technical University of Denmark 

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New health monitors are flexible, transparent and graphene enabled

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Wednesday, September 18, 2019

New technological devices are prioritizing non-invasive tracking of vital signs not only for fitness monitoring, but also for the prevention of common health problems such as heart failure, hypertension, and stress related complications, among others. Wearables based on optical detection mechanisms are proving an invaluable approach for reporting on our bodies inner workings and have experienced a large penetration into the consumer market in recent years.

Current wearable technologies, based on non-flexible components, do not deliver the desired accuracy and can only monitor a limited number of vital signs. To tackle this problem, conformable non-invasive optical-based sensors that can measure a broader set of vital signs are at the top of the end-users’ wish list.

In a recent study published in Science Advances ("Flexible graphene photodetectors for wearable fitness monitoring"), ICFO researchers have demonstrated a new class of flexible and transparent wearable devices that are conformable to the skin and can provide continuous and accurate measurements of multiple human vital signs. These devices can measure heart rate, respiration rate and blood pulse oxygenation, as well as exposure to UV radiation from the sun.

While the device measures the different parameters, the read-out is visualized and stored on a mobile phone interface connected to the wearable via Bluetooth. In addition, the device can operate battery-free since it is charged wirelessly through the phone.

“It was very important for us to demonstrate the wide range of potential applications for our advanced light sensing technology through the creation of various prototypes, including the flexible and transparent bracelet, the health patch integrated on a mobile phone and the UV monitoring patch for sun exposure. They have shown to be versatile and efficient due to these unique features”, reports Dr. Emre Ozan Polat, first author of this publication.

The bracelet was fabricated in such a way that it adapts to the skin surface and provides continuous measurement during activity (see Figure 1). The bracelet incorporates a flexible light sensor that can optically record the change in volume of blood vessels, due to the cardiac cycle, and then extract different vital signs such as heart rate, respiration rate and blood pulse oxygenation.

Secondly, the researchers report on the integration of a graphene health patch onto a mobile phone screen, which instantly measures and displays vital signs in real time when a user places one finger on the screen (see Figure 2). A unique feature of this prototype is that the device uses ambient light to operate, promoting low-power-consumption in these integrated wearables and thus, allowing a continuous monitoring of health markers over long periods of time.

ICFO’s advanced light sensing technology has implemented two types of nanomaterials: graphene, a highly flexible and transparent material made of one-atom thick layer of carbon atoms, together with a light absorbing layer made of quantum dots. The demonstrated technology brings a new form factor and design freedom to the wearables’ field, making graphene-quantum-dots-based devices a strong platform for product developers.

 

Dr. Antonios Oikonomou, business developer at ICFO emphasized this by stating that “The booming wearables industry is eagerly looking to increase fidelity and functionality of its offerings. Our graphene-based technology platform answers this challenge with a unique proposition: a scalable, low-power system capable of measuring multiple parameters while allowing the translation of new form factors into products.”

Dr. Stijn Goossens, co-supervisor of the study, also comments that “we have made a breakthrough by showing a flexible, wearable sensing system based on graphene light sensing components. Key was to pick the best of the rigid and flexible worlds. We used the unique benefits of flexible components for vital sign sensing and combined that with the high performance and miniaturization of conventional rigid electronic components.”

Finally, the researchers have been able to demonstrate a broad wavelength detection range with the technology, extending the functionality of the prototypes beyond the visible range. By using the same core technology, they have fabricated a flexible UV patch prototype (see Figure 3) capable of wirelessly transferring both power and data, and operating battery-free to sense the environmental UV-index. continuous monitoring of health markers over long periods of time.

The patch operates with a low power consumption and has a highly efficient UV detection system that can be attached to clothing or skin, and used for monitoring radiation intake from the sun, alerting the wearer of any possible over-exposure.

“We are excited about the prospects for this technology, pointing to a scalable route for the integration of graphene-quantum-dots into fully flexible wearable circuits to enhance form, feel, durability, and performance”, remarks Prof. Frank Koppens, leader of the Quantum Nano-Optoelectronics group at ICFO. “Such results show that this flexible wearable platform is compatible with scalable fabrication processes, proving mass-production of low-cost devices is within reach in the near future.”

Tags:  Antonios Oikonomou  Emre Ozan Polat  Frank Koppens  Graphene  Healthcare  ICFO  nanomaterials  quantum dots  Sensors  Stijn Goossens 

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Graphene and silk make self-healable electronic tattoos

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Tuesday, March 26, 2019
Updated: Tuesday, March 26, 2019
Researchers have designed graphene-based e-tattoos designed to act as biosensors. The sensors can collect data relate to human health, such as skin reactions to medication or to assess the degree of exposure to ultraviolet light.

Considerable research has gone into electronic tattoos (or e-tattoos), as part of the emerging field of or epidermal electronics. These are a thin form of wearable electronics, designed to be fitted to the skin. The aim of these lightweight sensors is to collect physiological data through sensors.

The types of applications of the sensors, from Tsinghua University, include assessing exposure to ultraviolet light to the skin (where the e-tattoos function as dosimeters) and for the collection of ‘vital signs’ to assess overall health or reaction to a particular medication (biosensors).

The use of graphene aids the collection of electric signals and it also imparts material properties to the sensors, allowing them to be bent, pressed, and twisted without any loss to sensors functionality.

The new sensors, developed in China, have shown – via as series of tests – good sensitivity to external stimuli like strain, humidity, and temperature. The basis of the sensor is a material matrix composed of a graphene and silk fibroin combination.

The highly flexible e‐tattoos are manufactured by printing a suspension of graphene, calcium ions and silk fibroin. Through this process the graphene flakes distributed in the matrix form an electrically conductive path. The path is highly responsive to environmental changes and it can detect multi-stimuli.

The e‐tattoo is also capable of self-healing. The tests showed how the tattoo heals after damage by water. This occurs due to the reformation of hydrogen and coordination bonds at the point of any fracture. The healing efficiency was demonstrated to be 100 percent and it take place in less than one second.

The researchers are of the view that the e-tattoos can be used as electrocardiograms, for assessing breathing, and for monitoring temperature changes. This means that the e‐tattoo model could be the basis for a new generation of epidermal electronics.

Commenting on the research, chief scientist Yingying Zhang said: “Based on the superior capabilities of our e-tattoos, we believe that such skin-like devices hold great promise for manufacturing cost-effective artificial skins and wearable electronics.”

Tags:  biosensors  Electronics  Graphene  Healthcare  Tsinghua University  Yingying Zhang 

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Graphene and related materials safety: human health and the environment

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Monday, January 28, 2019
Updated: Friday, January 25, 2019

As the drive to commercialise graphene continues, it is important that all safety aspects are thoroughly researched and understood. The Graphene Flagship project has a dedicated Work Package studying the impact of graphene and related materials on our health, as well as their environmental impact. This enables safety by design to become a core part of innovation.



Researches and companies are currently using a range of materials such as few layered graphene, graphene oxide and heterostructures. The first step to assess the toxicology is to fully characterise these materials. This work overviews the production and characterisation methods, and considers different materials, which biological effects depend on their inherent properties.

"One of the key messages is that this family of materials has varying properties, thus displaying varying biological effects. It is important to emphasize the need not only for a systematic analysis of well-characterized graphene-based materials, but also the importance of using standardised in vitro or in vivo assays for the safety assessment," says Bengt Fadeel, lead author of this paper working at Graphene Flagship partner Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.

"This review correlates the physicochemical characteristics of graphene and related materials to the biological effects. A classification based on lateral dimensions, number of layers and carbon-to-oxygen ratio allows us to describe the parameters that can alter graphene's toxicology. This can orient future development and use of these materials," explains Alberto Bianco, from Graphene Flagship partner CNRS, France and deputy leader of the Graphene Flagship Work Package on Health and Environment.

The paper gives a comprehensive overview of all aspects of graphene health and environmental impact, focussing on the potential interactions of graphene-based materials with key target organs including immune system, skin, lungs, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, central nervous system, reproductive system, as well as a wide range of other organisms including bacteria, algae, plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates in various ecosystems.

"One cannot draw conclusions from previous work on other carbon-based materials such as carbon nanotubes and extrapolate to graphene. Graphene-based materials are less cytotoxic when compared to carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide is readily degradable by cells of the immune system," comments Fadeel.

Andrea C. Ferrari, Science and Technology Officer of the Graphene Flagship and Chair of its Management Panel added that "understanding any potential Health and Environmental impacts of graphene and related materials has been at the core of all Graphene Flagship activities since day one. This review provides a solid guide for the safe use of these materials, a key step towards their widespread utilization as targeted by our innovation and technology roadmap."

Tags:  Graphene  graphene oxide  Healthcare  The Graphene Flagship 

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Graphene enables a test for cancer that is faster, more accurate and less expensive!

Posted By Terrance Barkan, Monday, October 16, 2017

An international team of researchers led by Professor Steven Conlan, Swansea University Medical School and the Centre for NanoHealth has won an international award for a graphene biosensor based diagnostic test for ovarian cancer which is quicker, more accurate, less expensive and portable.

The team developed a testing device which can diagnose ovarian cancer in a few minutes using a drop of blood. This portable technology is different from the ones currently in the hospital environment and allows for greater flexibility in terms of monitoring a patient even after she has already been diagnosed with ovarian cancer.

As well as the test being simple and fast the test does not require a technically-developed laboratory or a specialized technician to operate it which reduces costs and means that there isn’t a need for a centralisation of services. The device can also be used with other biomarkers to detect other types of disease.

Ovarian cancer research award ‌Professor Conlan, together with colleagues Dr Sofia Teixeira (Swansea University College of Engineering), Drs Lewis Francis, Deya Gonzalez and Lavinia Margarit (from the Swansea University Medical School), and Dr Ines Pinto from the International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, INL, Braga, Portugal have been recognised for their pioneering work with the award of the i3S Hovine Capital Health Innovation prize.
 
Professor Conlan said: “The Hovione prize will allow the team to initiate the process of moving our device from the lab to the patient. Whilst there is much work to be done, this is an important step towards the better and earlier diagnosis of patients with ovarian cancer. Cooperation between the two European centres has been key in realising this achievement.”

i3S Hovine Capital Health Innovation prize, created this year, aims at distinguishing innovative ideas in the area of health. The winners of the grand prize receive €35,000 in financing and services that include a market study, development of a business plan, technology validation by industrial experts, and support in setting up a company based on the winning technology.

The i3S-Hovione Capital Health Innovation Prize is supported internationally by the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT-Health) and has partnerships with several entities, such as Bluecinical (PT), Patentree (PT), SRS Advogados (PT), Impact Science (UK), and ANI / MCTES (PT) through its Bfk Award.

Tags:  Biosensor  Cancer  Graphene  Healthcare  Medical 

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