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AMD joins the WSRF framework programme

Posted By Graphene Council, Thursday, September 17, 2020
Advanced Material Development has been selected to join the WSRF framework programme led by QinetiQ and involving over 100 leading industrial and academic suppliers, all focused on developing exploitable technologies for the UK Armed Forces.

John Lee, CEO of AMD, said “This is a highly significant development for AMD in acknowledging both the important role materials science has to play and more specifically, the core need for nanomaterials development, in new defence-sector technologies. AMD is delighted to be welcomed into such esteemed company and we look forward to making a fundamental contribution to this vital programme, combining our R&D expertise with highly experienced companies in this sector.”

Tags:  Advanced Material Development  defence  Graphene  John Lee  nanomaterials  QinetiQ 

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Pretty as a peacock: The gemstone for the next generation of smart sensors

Posted By Graphene Council, Tuesday, May 19, 2020
An international team of scientists, led by the Universities of Surrey and Sussex, has developed colour-changing, flexible photonic crystals that could be used to develop sensors that warn when an earthquake might strike next.

The wearable, robust and low-cost sensors can respond sensitively to light, temperature, strain or other physical and chemical stimuli making them an extremely promising option for cost-effective smart visual sensing applications in a range of sectors including healthcare and food safety. 

In a study published by the journal Advanced Functional Materials, researchers outline a method to produce photonic crystals containing a minuscule amount of graphene resulting in a wide range of desirable qualities with outputs directly observable by the naked eye.

Intensely green under natural light, the extremely versatile sensors change colour to blue when stretched or turn transparent after being heated.

Dr. Izabela Jurewicz, Lecturer in Soft Matter Physics at the University of Surrey’s Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, said “This work provides the first experimental demonstration of mechanically robust yet soft, free-standing and flexible, polymer-based opals containing solution-exfoliated pristine graphene. While these crystals are beautiful to look at, we’re also very excited about the huge impact they could make to people’s lives.”

Alan Dalton, Professor Of Experimental Physics at the University of Sussex’s School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, said: ““Our research here has taken inspiration from the amazing biomimicry abilities in butterfly wings, peacock feathers and beetle shells where the colour comes from structure and not from pigments. Whereas nature has developed these materials over millions of years we are slowly catching up in a much shorter period.”

Among their many potential applications are:

Time-temperature indicators (TTI) for intelligent packaging – The sensors are able to give a visual indication if perishables, such as food or pharmaceuticals, have experienced undesirable time-temperature histories. The crystals are extremely sensitive to even a small rise in temperature between 20 and 100 degrees C.

Finger print analysis - Their pressure-responsive shape-memory characteristics are attractive for biometric and anti-counterfeiting applications. Pressing the crystals with a bare finger can reveal fingerprints with high precision showing well-defined ridges from the skin.

Bio-sensing – The photonic crystals can be used as tissue scaffolds for understanding human biology and disease. If functionalised with biomolecules could act as highly sensitive point-of-care testing devices for respiratory viruses offering inexpensive, reliable, user-friendly biosensing systems.

Bio/health monitoring – The sensors mechanochromic response allows for their application as body sensors which could help improve technique in sports players.

Healthcare safety – Scientists suggest the sensors could be used in a wrist band which changes colour to indicate to patients if their healthcare practitioner has washed their hands before entering an examination room.

The research draws on the Materials Physics Group’s (University of Sussex) expertise in the liquid processing of two-dimensional nanomaterials, Soft Matter Group's (University of Surrey) experience in polymer colloids and combines it with expertise at the Advanced Technology Institute in optical modelling of complex materials. Both universities are working with the Sussex-based company Advanced Materials Development (AMD) Ltd to commercialise the technology.

Joseph Keddie, Professor of Soft Matter Physics at the University of Surrey, said: “Polymer particles are used to manufacture everyday objects such as inks and paints. In this research, we were able finely distribute graphene at distances comparable to the wavelengths of visible light and showed how adding tiny amounts of the two-dimensional wonder-material leads to emerging new capabilities.” 

John Lee, CEO of Advanced Materials Development (AMD) Ltd, said: “Given the versatility of these crystals, this method represents a simple, inexpensive and scalable approach to produce multi-functional graphene infused synthetic opals and opens up exciting applications for novel nanomaterial-based photonics. We are very excited to be able to bring it to market in near future.”

Tags:  2D materials  Advanced Materials Development  Alan Dalton  Graphene  Izabela Jurewicz  John Lee  Joseph Keddie  nanomaterials  photonics  Universities of Surrey  Universities of Sussex 

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AMD announces appointment of Dr Anthony Thomson to Advisory Panel and CEO to Life Science subsidiary, CoM3D

Posted By Graphene Council, Tuesday, March 31, 2020

AMD is delighted to announce the appointment of Dr Anthony Thomson MSc MBA PhD FRSM to its Advisory Panel to advise on IP commercialisation. In addition, he will also take on the role of CEO of Life Science subsidiary company CoM3D which is working in conjunction with our partners at the University of Texas at Austin under the guidance of Dr Mohammed Maniruzzaman.

Anthony held numerous leadership roles in technology, automotive, health, capital markets and University sectors and has led the formation, growth and exit of several businesses including corporate ventures and University spin-outs, most recently managing a successful exit to US giant, Qualcomm.

AMD CEO John Lee says, “I have known Anthony several years and have sought his valuable guidance several times in the history of our company – I look forward to his growing involvement in our day to day business and especially in the application of his skills to the development of CoM3D”.

In addition to his work with AMD and COM3D, Anthony is also a Non-Exec director of a number of high growth SMEs across diverse sectors including Cyber Security, IT and Digital Transformation, Built Environment, Retail and Healthcare. His leadership roles include CBO of Elephants Child Advisory, Chief Strategy Officer at Isansys Lifecare and various senior roles at Qualcomm; University of Auckland; Euronext; ABN AMRO; BNP Paribas; LIFFE and Chesterton.

Anthony has an MSc and a PhD from the University of Otago (NZ) and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine. His strategic business skills are also recognised with an MBA from Cranfield School of Management where his thesis received the Deans Prize for its insight into commercialisation strategies for University technology. He has also completed the Proteus Leadership Programme at London Business School.

Tags:  Anthony Thomson  Applied Graphene Materials  COM3D  Graphene  John Lee 

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Nanotech SME and University of Sussex team up with Walmart to reduce retail waste

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Wednesday, February 12, 2020
Nanomaterial specialists Advanced Material Development (AMD) and researchers from the University of Sussex Business School have teamed up with Walmart to examine and develop the impact of bringing an innovative solution into retail supply chains, significantly reducing metal waste.

The project will be funded via a grant from UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the National Productivity Investment Fund. It follows the recent £8 million ESRC investment into the Digital Futures at Work Research Centre.

The funded project will examine the employment consequences of the development, adoption and implementation of new environmentally friendly digital technologies; in this case Radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags in the retail sector. Material scientist Professor Alan Dalton and his team have created an alternative to the traditional metal tags on clothing and food by developing antennas based on graphene inks.

John Lee, CEO of AMD, said: “Our work at Sussex in the field of highly conductive inks has partly been driven by demands from the retail industry searching for a sustainable solution in the replacement of metal content in RFID antennas. We are continuing to improve our technology for our partners in this space, with a possible large-scale print trial this year. The opportunity to work with a company with the global impact and sustainability reputation of Walmart is a substantial boost for us, and testament to the potential value of this innovation.”

AMD has recently announced a £1.5m equity funding round as the company further extends its nano-material research and development operations. It will also support its government and industry partnerships in Europe and the US. The business has now incorporated in the United States and formed an office presence in the Washington metropolitan area.

“This is a key development in the AMD business plan,” said John Lee. “The U.S. effort has been the key thrust for our business in the last year and our success to date is notable. Our partners have urged us to establish a local presence and we now see this to be just the start of a huge growth opportunity for the company.”

Professor Alan Dalton from the School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences at the University of Sussex said: “The nanotech ink we create in our lab has loads of important, sustainable applications. We’re excited that our world-leading research has paved the way for Walmart and other retailers to bin metal-dependent tags and replace them with our much more eco-friendly answer. There’s no need now for the old-fashioned supermarket tags of the past to populate landfill sites.”

As part of the project, social sciences and management studies academics will examine the learning process from product development to implementation and its impact on labour requirements and productivity. The global RFID market was estimated to be worth US$11bn in 2018, and is predicted to increase to US$13.4bn by 2022.

Professor Jackie O’Reilly, Co-Director for the new Digital Futures at Work Research Centre (digit-research.org), said: “This is a fantastically exciting project. It is a unique opportunity to work with brilliant physics researchers to understand their world and what they create; to understand how these hard science ideas are exported into the business world; and to understand how these decisions affect the way work is constructed and what kinds of jobs people get as a result of major companies adopting these new technologies."

Tags:  Advanced Material Development  Alan Dalton  Graphene  Jackie O’Reilly  John Lee  nanomaterials  RFID  University of Sussex 

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Blue sky inking: How nanomaterials could lower retail waste and speed up the stock take

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Thursday, February 6, 2020
As part of the new £8 million ESRC investment in Digital Futures at Work Research Centre, University of Sussex academics and an innovative SME have teamed up with the world's largest retail company to understand how quantum digital technology could revolutionise employment in the retail sector and significantly reduce metal waste.

University academics and Advanced Material Development (AMD) are working with Quantum Physics researchers, sociologists at the University of Sussex Business School digit centre and Walmart to understand how more environmentally-friendly radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags are developed, implemented and affect employment in the retail sector.

Materials scientist Professor Alan Dalton and his team have created an alternative to metal tags on clothing and food by developing antennas based on graphene inks which can be printed onto paper creating a sustainable solution to an essential part of the retail supply chain.

As part of the project, social sciences and management studies academics from the Digit Centre at the University of Sussex Business School will examine the learning process from product development to implementation and its impact on labour requirements and productivity.

Professor Alan Dalton from the School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences at the University of Sussex said: "The nanotech ink we create in our lab has loads of important, sustainable applications.

"We're excited that our world-leading research has paved the way for Walmart and other retailers to bin metal-dependent tags and replace them with our much more eco-friendly answer.

"There's no need now for the old fashioned supermarket tags of the past to populate landfill sites." The global RFID market was estimated to be worth US$11bn in 2018, and is predicted to increase to US$13.4bn by 2022.

Graphene-based nanomaterial inks, where the individual components are invisible to the human eye, have been developed as coatings which could replace metals in RFID systems and which can be applied to a range of surfaces using commercial printing techniques such as ink-jet, screen and flexographic.

The capability of the inks are also being expanded through the application of a quantum microscope - developed and constructed by the Sussex Programme for Quantum Research.

John Lee, CEO of AMD, said: "Our work at Sussex in the field of highly conductive inks has partly been driven by demands from the retail industry searching for a sustainable solution in the replacement of metal content in RFID antennas.

"We are continuing to improve our technology for our partners in this space, with a possible large scale print trial this year, and the opportunity to work with a company with the global impact and sustainability reputation of Walmart is a substantial boost and support of the need for us."

AMD has recently announced a £1.5m equity funding round as the company further extends its nanomaterial research and development operations. It will also support its government and industry partnerships in Europe and the US.

Professor Jackie O'Reilly, Co-Director for the new Digital Futures at Work Research Centre at the University of Sussex Business School, said: "The potential for this technology is huge.

"Implementation of RFID systems can transform supply chain efficiencies for large companies with complex supplier bases and can significantly reduce inventory count time from hundreds to a handful of hours.

"While this is hugely beneficial for companies, there is clearly the potential for huge consequences on employment rates, worker satisfaction and wellbeing that need to be adequately investigated.

"This is a unique opportunity to work with brilliant physics researchers to understand their world and what they create; to understand how these hard core science ideas are exported into the business world; and to understand how these?decisions?affect the way work is constructed and what kinds of jobs people get as a result of major companies adopting these new technologies."

Tags:  Advanced Material Development  Alan Dalton  biomaterials  Graphene  John Lee  nanomaterials  RFID  University of Sussex 

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Advanced Material Development announces £1.5M funding round and Incorporates in the U.S.

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Wednesday, January 15, 2020
Advanced Material Development Ltd is pleased to announce it has raised in excess of £1.5M in new equity funding to further extend its nano-material research and development operations and support its government and industry partnerships in Europe and the US.

CEO John Lee said: “We are delighted to have received such strong support from both existing and new shareholders in this latest round of funding. This enables the company to extend a number of our existing projects and expedite those moving towards application and commercial outcomes with a rapidly expanding number of partner engagements.”

Advanced Material Development (AMD) is delighted to announce it has now incorporated in the United States and established an office presence in the Washington metropolitan area.

AMD CEO John Lee says “This is a key development in the AMD business plan. The U.S. effort has been the key thrust for our business in the last year and our success to date is notable. Our partners have urged us to establish a local presence and we now see this to be just the start of a huge growth opportunity for the company”

Tags:  Advanced Material Development  Graphene  John Lee  nanomaterials 

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AMD secures further UK Defence and Security Accelerator funding

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Tuesday, November 26, 2019
AMD is delighted to announce its second award for funding via the UK Defence and Security Accelerator (DASA) in the field of Nanobarcoding, “Authenticating Critical Components”.

Both the UK &US defence agencies have been extremely supportive of our work and we look forward to continuing developing these rewarding relationships.

CEO John Lee comments “This year has seen a rapid evolution in AMD’s involvement in the area of protecting both military and civilian personnel. Following on from our work in signature management we are now able, with the support of DASA funding, to further our efforts in our key vertical of anti-counterfeiting technologies. 

Our work with the Materials Physics teams at Sussex and now Surrey continues to drive some very exciting areas of innovation with specific commercial applications and it looks like 2020 will see some major developments for us in a multitude of areas.”

AMD is also currently engaged with a number of leading global businesses developing material applications for the commercial and environmental challenges faced in industries such as automotive and consumer supply chains, sensing and life sciences.

Tags:  Advanced Material Development  Graphene  John Lee  nanobarcoding  UK Defence and Security Accelerator 

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