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Paragraf and NPL Demonstrate that Paragraf’s Graphene Hall Effect Sensors are ready for High-radiation Applications in Space and Beyond

Posted By Graphene Council, 20 hours ago
Paragraf, the leader in graphene-based transformative electronic sensors and devices, has demonstrated the ability of its graphene Hall Effect sensors to withstand high levels of radiation. The discovery, based on testing from the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), proves that ‘unpackaged’ Hall Effect sensors can be used in high-radiation environments such as space. The project was funded by Innovate UK, the UK’s innovation agency.

Used to measure the magnitude of magnetic fields, Hall Effect sensors are a critical electronic component in a variety of applications, from proximity sensing and speed detection through to current sensing. However, historically, their deployment in high-radiation environments such as satellites and nuclear power plants has faced significant challenges. This is because conventional sensors made from silicon and other semiconductor materials react adversely to neutron radiation, unless they are encapsulated in radiation-hardened packaging. This entails a more complex, lengthy, and costly manufacturing process and may require the sensor to be replaced over time if, for example, the packaging is damaged.

By contrast, tests conducted by NPL have shown that following exposure to a neutron dose of 241 mSv/hour – which is about 30,000 times the expected typical neutron dose rate in the International Space Station – Paragraf graphene Hall Effect sensors are not affected by this level of radiation. This is the first time that a commercially available, graphene-based electronic device has proved impervious to neutron irradiation.

In situations where power and weight savings are as critical as radiation tolerance, for example on satellites and other space vehicles, Paragraf Hall Effect sensors really come into their own – requiring only pW’s of power and weighing only fractions of a gram.

Ivor Guiney, co-founder of Paragraf, commented: “NPL’s findings have the potential to be a game changer when it comes to high-performance satellites and other critical high-radiation applications such as nuclear decommissioning. Owing to the exceptional mechanical strength and high transparency of graphene, our Hall Effect sensor can be used reliably in high-radiation applications without requiring packaging. This is key to improving reliability and durability while reducing manufacturing costs and time to market.”

The ability of graphene Hall Effect sensors to perform under high-radiation conditions will pave the way for the deployment of a broader range of electronics in harsh environments. Thanks to Paragraf’s scalable manufacturing process for large-area graphene deposition, it may soon be possible to produce other radiation-resistant graphene-based electronic devices. This will help ensure that all critical electronics, beyond sensors, are reliable and durable even in harsh environments.

Héctor Corte-Leon at NPL added: “Our first set of findings is very promising, and we are now expecting more positive outcomes over the next few months. Testing graphene-based electronics is key to demonstrating whether they can be used in harsh environments where, traditionally, their deployment has been limited.”

Graphene Hall Effect sensors from Paragraf are now set to undergo further radiation testing (alpha, beta and gamma radiation) as well as high-frequency testing. This is expected to open-up new opportunities across critical applications such as current sensing. The project, funded by Innovate UK, the UK’s innovation agency, started in October 2019, and is due to run until the end of 2020.

Tags:  Electronics  Graphene  Héctor Corte-Leon  Innovate UK  Ivor Guiney  National Physical Laboratory  Paragraf  Sensors 

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First Graphene continues to validate PureGRAPH® Product Quality through National Physical Laboratory (NPL) collaboration

Posted By Graphene Council, Tuesday, September 8, 2020
The assurance of product quality and consistency is vital for the successful adoption of graphene additives by downstream customers. With a strong focus on product quality with its PureGRAPH® graphene product range, First Graphene has made significant progress in this area. Implementing state of the art analytical methods, participating in establishing international standards (ISO/TC229) and use of 6-sigma approaches to control manufacturing processes have all contributed to establishing PureGRAPH® as the leading brand for quality in the industry[i]. First Graphene continues to pursue improved methods for the characterisation of graphene products and has announced a new collaboration with the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), UK a globally acknowledged, independent laboratory.

World-leading measurement solutions are critical to business and government, accelerating research and innovation, improving quality of life and enabling trade. Following the COVID-19 crisis the NPL with the support of National Measurement Laboratory partners launched the Measurement for Recovery (M4R) programme[ii], to support UK companies. First Graphene has successfully secured a place on the programme to study the Specific Surface Area of PureGRAPH® products.

Specific Surface Area is an important parameter of graphene platelets, that may impact dispersion and polymer wetting, and a critical parameter for regulatory authorities to enable them to categorise new substances and compare toxicology and environmental fate profiles. Specific Surface Area of powders is typically characterised by the BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) method which uses nitrogen gas adsorption to characterise the surface area. In recent work by NPL[iii], researchers investigated factors that impact upon BET measurements including the pristine nature of the graphene platelets.

In the collaborative M4R project, NPL researchers will determine the BET specific surface area of a range of PureGRAPH® products and intermediates, to determine the factors that affect the results of BET measurements.  The project is currently underway.

Paul Ladislaus, CTO of First Graphene says, “This study will provide further understanding of the surface area of our products, enabling us to provide world-class information to our customers and regulatory authorities.”

Keith Paton, Senior Research Scientist at NPL says “The M4R programme supports projects with UK companies, such as First Graphene, to enable innovation through measurement and this study will provide important insights into how the BET method can be effectively deployed by the graphene industry.”

Tags:  additives  First Graphene  Graphene  Keith Paton  National Physical Laboratory  Paul Ladislaus 

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Surrey PhD student publishes award-winning work on graphene

Posted By Graphene Council, Monday, July 20, 2020
Elizabeth Legge, a PhD student who jointly studies at our Advanced Technology Institute (ATI) and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), has published research that could help manufacturers involved in the multi-million pound graphene market.

“Graphene is a two-dimensional material containing a single layer of carbon atoms in a hexagonal lattice,” explains Elizabeth, whose research won the Infared and Raman Discussion Group (IRDG) Chalmers and Dent Award, and saw her present her findings at a conference in Palm Springs, USA. “A single layer of graphene has a thickness of around 0.34 nanometres. To give some idea of scale, one million nanometres form a millimetre.

“But it has impressive qualities. It’s the strongest material ever measured, more than 200 times stronger than steel, so it can significantly increase overall strength when just a small amount of graphene is combined with another material.

“It’s also incredibly light and it has high electrical and thermal conductivity, so it has a wide range of manufacturing and industrial applications.

“This can range from something like adding graphene powders to polymer compounds to create lighter and stronger tennis rackets, to moulding lighter and stronger body parts for cars and aeroplanes.”

However, it’s not always understood why improvements in product performance are achieved, which hinders the rate of product development. This is where Elizabeth’s work comes in.

“The research I’ve published in the journal, ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, describes the wide range of advanced analytic techniques we employed to understand the impact of adding different modifications of a proprietary graphene powder to different polymers,” continues Elizabeth.

“The work I did employed methods novel for commercial samples, such as tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. This uses a laser and a metal probe to scan the surface of a material, and record nanoscale chemical and physical features, which tell us how the modifications of this powder related to final product performance. This meant the company could better comprehend why they were getting increased functionality and durability results in some products, but not in others.

“In the long term, this will be useful for other businesses to assess their use of similar graphene powders. The new analytical techniques I employed suggest traditional methods of testing such powders should be supported by further experiments, like these, to fully determine the material properties.

“It’s valuable information for product development.”

Dr Andrew Pollard, Science Area Leader at NPL, said: “Understanding how the fundamental material properties of commercially available powders containing few-layer graphene affect the final performance of real-world products is crucial if new and innovative applications are to come to market.”

Professor Ravi Silva, Director of ATI at Surrey, added: “Surrey is pleased to work closely with NPL on this and many other strategic programmes that have given highly impactful output.”

Tags:  2D materials  ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces  Advanced Technology Institute  Dr Andrew Pollard  Elizabeth Legge  Graphene  Infared and Raman Discussion Group  National Physical Laboratory  Ravi Silva 

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Modifying graphene to improve composite materials performance

Posted By Graphene Council, Thursday, July 2, 2020

Scientists from the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), and Versarien Plc have successfully used graphene to improve the performance of composite materials and have determined how the chemical functionalisation of graphene has an effect via nanoscale imaging of the surface chemistry.

Graphene, a highly desirable material for a variety of applications; in the case of nanocomposites, can be functionalised and added as a nanofiller to alter the ultimate product properties, such as tensile strength. Often the material properties of the functionalised graphene and the location of any chemical species are not known. Consequently, it is not necessarily understood why improvements in product performance are achieved, which hinders the rate of product development.

Through the InnovateUK funded Analysis for Innovators programme, Versarien Plc, a company developing graphene products to help manufacturers improve their products’ functionality, approached NPL. Versarien wanted to explore how modifying their material, trademarked Nanene, could change how the flakes are dispersed in the polymers, and in turn, how this would change the polymer’s properties. Nanene is a graphitic powder containing few-layer graphene (FLG) flakes. It is important for customers to know whether improved dispersion of Nanene in composites will bring added benefits to products made from these enhanced polymers.

NPL applied a wide range of state-of-the-art measurement techniques to characterise the flakes and composites. One particularly novel aspect of the project involved tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) to provide nanoscale resolution of the graphene sample’s structural makeup and view defects within the flakes themselves.

Dr Andrew Pollard, Science Area Leader at NPL, said: “Understanding how the fundamental material properties of commercially-available powders containing few-layer graphene affect the final performance of real-world products, is crucial if these new and innovative applications are to come to market. It is exciting to see how advanced techniques measuring nanoscale properties can reveal the reasons for changes in the macroscale properties of composites.”

NPL’s research, in collaboration with the GEIC at the University of Manchester, the University of Liverpool and the University of Surrey, enabled Versarien to understand the materials at a structural and chemical level. The knowledge and data from this collaborative research benefits ongoing product development, helps provide insight and assurances to new and existing customers.

Versarien are carrying out further research to investigate whether the improved dispersion could yet be harnessed beneficially by making other changes to the chemistry of the graphene flakes.

Dr Stephen Hodge, Head of Research at Versarien, said: “The project gave us access to a very wide range of cutting-edge techniques that are simply not available outside of measurement labs. Particularly in the case of TERS, it was not just the instruments, but the ability to adapt them to our specific problem, which requires extremely high levels of expertise. That we could bring all of these together in one place brought huge benefit to understanding the structure of our product.”

Robin Wilson, Head of Manufacturing & Materials of InnovateUK, said: “The outcome of this A4I (InnovateUK) funded project is an excellent example of how metrology enables innovation.  It has had a far-reaching impact, as it has not only helped a UK company to fine tune their product development but has also resulted in a scientific publication that adds to the understanding of using graphene within the composite community.”

Tags:  Andrew Pollard  Graphene  Innovate UK  nanocomposites  National Physical Laboratory  Robin Wilson  Stephen Hodge  Versarien 

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Next Level Analysis for Haydale Functionalised Nanomaterials

Posted By Graphene Council, Wednesday, April 22, 2020
Haydale, the global advanced materials group, has been awarded an Innovate UK Analysis for Innovators (A4I) project to explore the mechanisms by which the Haydale plasma functionalisation processes enables property improvements in polymers containing functionalised nanomaterials; properties such as mechanical strength, thermal, and electrical conductivity.

The project enables Haydale to gain access to world leading experts and cutting-edge facilities by collaborating with the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) Hartree Centre.

The data produced in this project will help Haydale build on the significant progress it has already made in this area. It will enable Haydale to focusthe development of its entire product range; allowing quick and efficient selection of improved functionalisation chemistries that can optimise the performance of its current products.

Haydale has a range of plasma functionalised nanomaterial (HDPlas®) products which are dispersed in a variety of polymers to enhance customer products. Numerous developments conducted within Haydale have demonstrated that the use of its patented HDPlas® plasma technology is effective in imparting specific functional groupsto the nanomaterial surface for improved compatibility within the host polymer. This nanomaterial surface functionality leads to property enhancements in the final products above and beyond the use of un-functionalised nanomaterials.

This project aims to uncover this mechanism using a dual approach of advanced analytical techniques at NPL and modelling at STFC Hartree Centre. The approach of using analytical facilities with complementary modelling will ensure that the highest level of information is obtained, and that any conclusions are drawn with a high level of confidence and accuracy, thereby potentially enabling product and process development.

Keith Broadbent, Haydale CEO,said: “Haydale has a wealth of knowledge and expertise which hasled to the patenting of its HDPlas® functionalisation process. This analysis by both NPL and STFC will provide more data and practical understanding enabling us to further understand where our nanomaterials will provide benefit and continue to develop our unique processes to ensure we keep in the vanguard of this technology”

Barry Brennan, NPL Senior Research Scientist, said: “Understanding the chemistry of nanomaterials after industrial processing steps is crucial in determining the performance-enhancement in real-world products. We look forward to collaborating with Haydale on their functionalisation process.”

Tags:  Barry Brennan  Graphene  Haydale  Keith Broadbent  nanomaterial  National Physical Laboratory 

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Thomas Swan awarded funding from Innovate UK to further improve its graphene products

Posted By Graphene Council, Tuesday, January 21, 2020
Thomas Swan & Co. Ltd., one of the UK’s leading independent chemical manufacturers, today announced that it has been awarded funding from Innovate UK, under the Analysis for Innovators programme. The funding will support a project to develop a QC method for determining the aspect ratio for graphene nanoplatelets (GNP), working with the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), the UK’s National Metrology Institute and a World-renowned centre of excellence.

Thomas Swan is a global leader in the manufacture of carbon nanomaterials and 2D materials through patented high-shear liquid phase exfoliation technology. The ability to produce different variants and forms of graphene is of huge significance to Thomas Swan. In order to achieve this ambition, high aspect ratio graphene materials must be produced.

The grant aims to enhance Thomas Swan’s ability to measure the aspect ratio of its graphene products, which is currently done using their suite of SEM, PSD, Raman and other methods. The programme will focus on the Elicarb® GNP product line currently offered by Thomas Swan.

The project will allow Thomas Swan to become even more competitive in the field, by offering its customers a quick and cost-effective tool to improve the level of characterisation of its GNP products and therefore guaranteeing a higher quality and consistency of its materials. Furthermore, this will increase the number of options available to customers, resulting in the delivery of more refined products, allowing Thomas Swan to compete more effectively in areas of UK-focused innovation such as the nanocomposites, lubricants and battery materials application areas.

Michael Edwards, Commercial Director – Advanced Materials at Thomas Swan said, “being able to continue our close collaboration with the NPL means that we can maintain our high standard of product characterisation, integrity and quality which is paramount in the volume materials manufacturing business”.

Keith Paton, Senior Research Scientist at NPL said “this is a fantastic opportunity to apply the measurement capability developed at NPL to support UK industry to improve productivity and product quality. We are looking forward to working with Thomas Swan to deliver improved quality control measurement techniques to monitor the graphene nanoplatelet aspect ratio”

Tags:  2D materials  Graphene  Innovate UK  Keith Paton  Michael Edwards  nanocomposites  nanomaterials  National Physical Laboratory  Thomas Swan 

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Graphene gas sensors for real-time monitoring of air pollution

Posted By Graphene Council, Tuesday, January 7, 2020
Scientists at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), working with partners from the Graphene Flagship, Chalmers University of Technology, the Advanced Institute of Technology, Royal Holloway University and Linköping University, have created a low-cost, low-energy consuming NO2 sensor that measures NO2 levels in real-time.

The World Health Organisation reported that 4.2 million deaths every year are a direct result of exposure to ambient air pollution such as NO2, SO2, NH3, CO2 and CO. One of the most dangerous pollutants, NO2 gas, is produced by burning fossil fuels e.g. in diesel engines. Significant portions of the population in large cities, specifically London, have been consistently exposed to NO2 levels above the legislated limit. Even at very low concentrations NO2 is toxic for humans, leading to breathing problems, asthma attacks and potentially causing childhood obesity and dementia.  

NPL and partners have developed a graphene-based NO2 detector that reports pollutant levels based on changes in its electrical resistance. The high sensitivity of graphene to the local environment has shown to be highly advantageous in sensing applications, where ultralow concentrations of absorbed molecules induce a significant response on the electronic properties of graphene. The unique electronic structure makes graphene the ‘ultimate’ sensing material for applications in environmental monitoring and air quality.  

NPL has developed and demonstrated the novel type of NO2 sensors based on different types of graphene. This low-cost and technologically simple solution uses simple chemiresistor approach and allows for measurements of the exceedingly low levels of NO2 e.g. below 10 ppb. 1 ppb is a concentration equal to a droplet of ink in 2 Olympic size swimming pools. According to the World Health Organisation’s guidelines the targeted level of NO2 pollution in cities is 21 ppb however, the typical average level in London is 30-40 ppb.    

There is a well-demonstrated global need for high sensitivity, low-cost, low-energy consumption miniaturised NO2 gas sensors to be deployed in a dense network and to be used to pinpoint and avoid high pollution hot spots. Such sensors operating in real-time can help to visualise pollution in urban areas with unprecedently high local resolution. 

Olga Kazakova, National Physical Laboratory (NPL) states: “Understanding the problem is the first step to solving the problem. If you only monitor certain junctions or roads for NO2 pollution, you do not get an accurate picture of the environment. In order to do this, a dense network must be set up to show the dynamically changing level of pollution through different times of day and year, so you can get to know the real level of critical exposure.” 

With the data provided by a dense network of graphene sensors, people could us an app to check how much NO2 pollution they might be exposed to on their planned route, and city councils could use this information to dynamically restrict and divert cars near schools and hospitals. This would enable governing bodies to adopt smart and flexible restrictive measures in specific areas recognised as being highly pollutive. 

Tags:  Chalmers University of Technology  environment  Graphene  Graphene Flagship  National Physical Laboratory  Olga Kazakova  pollution  Sensors 

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World's First Verified Graphene Product™ Announced

Posted By Graphene Council, Wednesday, December 11, 2019

The world's first Verified Graphene Product™ has been approved by The Graphene Council.

MediaDevil’s CB-01 earphones make use of Nanene® graphene from Versarien in the CB-01’s audio diaphragm, enabling simultaneous optimisation of both the high and low-end audio frequencies. 

From FORBES:  "The detail the CB-01 earphones managed to squeeze from the music was captivating. These are remarkable."
 "...The CB-01 earphones from MediaDevil are a revelation. They are the first pair of graphene-coated earphones that made me sit up and take notice." 

Media Devil uses the finest materials and highly-skilled artisans to create premium quality products. These include full-grain European leather, Italian Rosewood, or precision engineered Aramid Fibre. And now Graphene, providing Media Devil customers with a unique experience.


Versarien (the supplier of Nanene™ graphene materials to Media Devil) is the first company in the world to pass the rigorous Verified Graphene Producer™ program administered by The Graphene Council.

This program involves an in-person inspection of graphene production facilities, analysis of random samples of graphene products and independent testing and characterization of the material by internationally recognized and qualified labs, such as the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the UK. 

Versarien uses proprietary materials technology to create innovative engineering solutions that are capable of having game-changing impact in a broad variety of industry sectors.

The Verified Graphene Producer™ and the Verified Graphene Product™ programs provide the world's most thorough, independent validation service, adding a level of transparency not available anywhere else and is based on the most up-to-date standards and testing protocols. 

This will be increasingly important to end-users and buyers of graphene as they search for reliable sources of supply.

 

Tags:  Graphene  Graphene Council  National Physical Laboratory  Versarien 

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New research uses graphene sensors to detect ultralow concentrations of NO2

Posted By Graphene Council, Wednesday, April 10, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, April 10, 2019
The research, as published in ACS Sensors, was led by an international collaboration of scientists from Linköping University, Chalmers University of Technology, Royal Holloway, University of London and the University of Surrey.

The findings demonstrate why single-layer graphene should be used in sensing applications and opens doors to new technology for use in environmental pollution monitoring, new portable monitors and automotive and mobile sensors for a global real-time monitoring network.

As part of the research, graphene-based sensors were tested in conditions resembling the real environment we live in and monitored for their performance. The measurements included, combining NO2, synthetic air, water vapor and traces of other contaminants, all in variable temperatures, to fully replicate the environmental conditions of a working sensor.

Key findings from the research showed that, although the graphene-based sensors can be affected by co-adsorption of NO2 and water on the surface, at about room temperature, their sensitivity to NO2 increased significantly when operated at elevated temperatures, 150 °C. This shows graphene sensitivity to different gases can be tuned by performing measurements at different temperatures.

Testing also revealed a single-layer graphene exhibits two times higher carrier concentration response upon exposure to NO2 than bilayer graphene — demonstrating single-layer graphene as a desirable material for sensing applications.

Christos Melios, a lead scientist on the project from NPL, said: “Evaluating the sensor performance in conditions resembling the real environment is an essential step in the industrialisation process for this technology.

“We need to be able to clarify everything from cross-sensitivity, drift in analysis conditions and recovery times, to potential limitations and energy consumption, if we are to provide confidence and consider usability in industry.”

By developing these very small sensors and placing them in key pollution hotspots, there is a potential to create a next-generation pollution map – which will be able to pinpoint the source of pollution earlier, in unprecedented detail, outlining the chemical breakdown of data in high resolution in a wide variety of climates.

Christos continued: “The use of graphene into these types of gas sensors, when compared to the standard sensors used for air emissions monitoring, allows us to perform measurements of ultra-low sensitivity while employing low cost and low energy consumption sensors. This will be desirable for future technologies to be directly integrated into the Internet of Things.”

NO2 typically enters the environment through the burning of fuel, vehicle emissions, power plants, and off-road equipment. Extreme exposure to NO2 can increase the chances of respiratory infections and asthma. Long-term exposure can cause chronic lung disease and is linked to pollution related death across the world.  

Figures from the European Environment Agency also links NO2 pollution to premature deaths in the UK, with the UK being ranked as having the second highest number of annual deaths in Europe. In 2014, 14,050 deaths in the UK were recorded as being NO2 pollution related, 5,900 of which were recorded in London alone1.

When interacted with water and other chemicals, NO2 can also form into acid rain, which severely damages sensitive ecosystems, such as lakes and forests.

Existing legislation from the European Commission suggests hourly exposure to NO2 concentration should not be exceeded by more than 200 micrograms per cubic metre (µg/m3) or ~106 parts per billion (ppb), and no more than 18 times annually. This translates to an annual mean of 40 mg m3 (~21 ppb) NO2 concentration2

In central London, for example, the average NO2 concentration for 2017 showed concentration levels of NO2 ranged from 34.2 to 44.1 ppb per month, a huge leap from the yearly average.

These figures show there is an urgent need for a low-cost solution to mitigate the impact of NO2 in the air around us. This work could provide the answer to early detection and prevention of these types of pollutants, in line with the government’s Clean Air Strategy.

Further experimentation in this area could see the graphene-based sensors introduced into industry within the next 2–5 years, providing an unprecedented level of understanding of the presence of NO2 in our air.

Tags:  Chalmers University of Technology  Christos Melios  Graphene  Linköping University  National Physical Laboratory  Royal Holloway  Sensors  University of London  University of Surrey 

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Versarien achieves "Verified Graphene Producer" status.

Posted By Terrance Barkan, Monday, April 1, 2019
Updated: Sunday, March 31, 2019

The Graphene Council is pleased to announce that Versarien plc is the first graphene company in the world to successfully complete the Verified Graphene Producer program, an independent, third party verification system that involves a physical inspection of the production facilities, a review of the entire production process, a random sample of product material and rigorous characterization and testing by a first class, international materials laboratory. 

The Verified Graphene Producer program is an important step to bring transparency and clarity to a rapidly changing and opaque market for graphene materials, providing graphene customers with a level of confidence that has not existed before. 

“We are pleased to have worked with the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the UK, regarded as one of the absolute top facilities for metrology and graphene characterization in the world.
 
They have provided outstanding analytical expertise for the materials testing portion of the program including Raman Spectroscopy, XPS, AFM and SEM testing services.” stated Terrance Barkan CAE, Executive Director of The Graphene Council.
 
Andrew Pollard, Science Area Leader of the Surface Technology Group, National Physical Laboratory, said: “In order to develop real-world products that can benefit from the ‘wonder material’, graphene, we first need to fully understand its properties, reliably and reproducibly.
 
 “Whilst international measurement standards are currently being developed, it is critical that material characterisation is performed to the highest possible level.
 
As the UK’s National Measurement Institute (NMI) with a focus on developing the metrology of graphene and related 2D materials, we aim to be an independent third party in the testing of graphene material for companies and associations around the world, such as The Graphene Council.” 
 
Neill Ricketts, CEO of Versarien said: “We are delighted that Versarien is the first graphene producer in the world to successfully complete the Graphene Council’s Verified Graphene Producer programme.”
 
“This is a huge validation of our technology and will enable our partners and potential customers to have confidence that the graphene we produce meets globally accepted standards.”

 

“There are many companies that claim to be graphene producers, but to enjoy the benefits that this material can deliver requires high quality, consistent product to be supplied.  The Verified Producer programme is designed to verify that our production facilities, processes and tested material meet the stringent requirements laid down by The Graphene Council.”

 “I am proud that Versarien has been independently acclaimed as a Verified Graphene Producer and look forward to making further progress with our collaboration partners and numerous other parties that we are in discussions with.”

James Baker CEng FIET, the CEO of Graphene@Manchester (which includes coordinating the efforts of the National Graphene Institute and the Graphene Engineering and Innovation Centre [GEIC]) stated: “We applaud The Graphene Council for promoting independent third party verification for graphene producers that is supported by world class metrology and characterization services."

"This is an important contribution to the commercialization of graphene as an industrial material and are proud to have The Graphene Council as an Affiliate Member of the Graphene Engineering and Innovation Centre (GEIC) here in Manchester ”. 

Successful commercialization of graphene materials requires not only the ability to produce graphene to a declared specification but to be able to do so at a commercial scale.

It is nearly impossible for a graphene customer to verify the type of material they are receiving without going through an expensive and time consuming process of having sample materials fully characterized by a laboratory that has the equipment and expertise to test graphene. 

The Verified Graphene Producer program developed by The Graphene Council provides a level of independent inspection and verification that is not available anywhere else. 

If you would like more information about the Verified Graphene Producer program or about other services and benefits provided by The Graphene Council, please contact;

Terrance Barkan CAE

Executive Director, The Graphene Council 

tbarkan@thegraphenecouncil.org  or directly at  +1 202 294 5563

Tags:  Andrew Pollard  Andy Pollard  Graphene  Graphene Standards  James Baker  Manchester  National Physical Laboratory  Neill Ricketts  NPL  Standards  Terrance Barkan  The Graphene Council  University of Manchester  UoM  Verified Graphene Producer  Versarien 

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