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New Nanosensor Detects Microscopic Contaminants in Water

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Tuesday, November 19, 2019
Good things come in small packages. Sadly, so do bad things. That’s where Iowa State University’s (ISU) Department of Mechanical Engineering comes in.

Led by Dr. Jonathan Claussen, ISU researchers have used nanotechnology to develop a sensor that can detect organophosphates at levels 40 times smaller than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommendations. Organophosphates are certain classes of insecticides used on crops throughout the world to kill insects.

“It is important that we quantify insecticide runoff and drift so that we can characterize its long-term effects and find ways to minimize those effects.”

USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture is supporting this research through a pair of Agriculture and Food Research Initiative grants totaling $573,000.

Claussen used the grants to develop Salt Impregnated Inkjet Maskless Lithography (SIIML), which uses an inkjet printer to create inexpensive graphene circuits with high electrical conductivity. He adds salts to the ink, which is later washed away to leave microsized divots or craters in the surface. This textured printed graphene surface is able to bind with pesticide-sensing enzymes to increase sensitivity during pesticide biosensing.

These sensors can detect contaminants as small as 0.6 nanometers (nM) in length, well below the EPA standard of 24 nM and Canada’s standard of 170 nM.

Claussen compares the graphene sensors to glucose test strips that diabetics use to monitor their blood. Both the glucose test strip and the graphene pesticide test strip monitor selected compounds through electrochemical means.

This technology can be adapted for field use to detect a wide range of samples, including pathogens in food and fertilizer in soil and water. The technology is so inexpensive, Claussen said, that sensors could be used across an entire farm field to monitor pesticides and fertilizers so that farmers could limit their use and apply only what is truly needed.

In addition to improving the environmental ecosystem, Claussen said that SIIML could improve food safety, from farm to fork.

“The sensors could be designed to detect pathogens in food processing facilities to prevent food contamination,” he said. “The sensors could also be used to monitor cattle diseases, for example, before physical symptoms are present. This technique could really be a game changer for a variety of in-field sensing applications that require low-cost but highly sensitive biosensors.”
 

Tags:  biosensors  Graphene  Iowa State University  Jonathan Claussen  Sensors 

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Tetra Pak explores Graphene material for the food and beverage manufacturing industry

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Friday, October 18, 2019
Tetra Pak has joined the European Commission Graphene Flagship project as the exclusive representative from the packaging industry to explore possible future applications of graphene in food and beverage (F&B) manufacturing. 

Graphene is a carbon-based material, one of the thinnest known to mankind, one atom thick, while also being incredibly strong: around 200 times stronger than steel. It is an excellent conductor of heat, electricity and has a wide range of light absorption abilities. Graphene material could bring breakthrough innovations with unlimited potential for integration in almost any industry.

Prof Konstantin Novoselov, Physicist and Nobel Prize Winner said: ‘Graphene has the potential to revolutionise a range of processes and industries. Since Graphene’s first isolation in 2004, we have seen tremendous success and marketplace application of the material within electronics and automotive industries, I’m looking forward to the next phase of the Graphene Flagship and exploring potential innovations in the packaging industry.’

Sara De Simoni, VP, Equipment Engineering, Tetra Pak said: ‘Tetra Pak’s involvement with the European Graphene Flagship is one example of our ambition to drive innovation to the next level. It is a privilege to be the only representative from our industry in this research initiative and puts us at the cutting edge to address challenges through multidisciplinary research and development together with our industry partners.’

Tetra Pak is leading R&D in the packaging sector, exploring the potential graphene holds to unlock a range of new and revolutionary innovations for the F&B industry, including: 

Packaging material innovation – is being examined to see how graphene could offer coatings to reduce carbon footprint in packaging supply chain, graphene can also enhance the performance of current packaging materials, enable new functionality as well as increase recyclability.

Smart Packaging – with the development of smart packaging, graphene’s ultra-thin flexible sensors can be integrated to packages as data carriers for producers, retailers and consumers. Graphene sensors can also be smaller, lighter and less expensive than traditional sensors.

Next generation of equipment – exploring how graphene composites can be used to make equipment lighter and more energy efficient has the potential to reduce costs and energy consumption.  With only modifications needed to equipment over additional purchases, both time and money are saved.

Tags:  Graphene  Konstantin Novoselov  Sara De Simoni  Sensors  Tetra Pak  The Graphene Flagship 

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Smart Insole Can Double As Lifesaving Technology For Diabetic Patients

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Monday, October 14, 2019
Updated: Tuesday, October 15, 2019
Stevens Institute of Technology has signed an exclusive licensing agreement with Bonbouton, giving the cutting-edge health and technology company the right to use and further develop a graphene sensing system that detects early signs of foot ulcers before they form so people living with diabetes can access preventative healthcare and confidently manage their health.

The smart insole, Bonbouton’s first product, can be inserted into a sneaker or dress shoe to passively monitor the foot health of a person living with diabetes. The data are then sent to a companion app which can be accessed by the patient and shared with their healthcare provider, who can determine if intervention or treatment is needed.

“I was inspired by two things—a desire to help those with diabetes and a desire to commercialize the technology,” said Bonbouton Founder and CEO Linh Le, who developed and patented the core graphene technology while pursuing a doctorate in chemical engineering at Stevens. Le came up with the idea to create an insole that could help prevent diabetic ulcers after several personal incidents lead him to pursue preventative healthcare.

Complications from diabetes can make it difficult for patients to monitor their foot heath. Chronically high levels of blood glucose can impair blood vessels and cause nerve damage. Patients can experience a lot of pain, but can also lose feeling in their feet. Diabetes-related damage to blood vessels and nerves can lead to hard-to-treat infections such as ulcers. Ulcers that don’t heal can cause severe damage to tissues and bone and may require amputation of a toe, foot or part of a leg.

Bonbouton’s smart insoles sense the skin’s temperature, pressure and other foot health-related data, which can alert a patient and his or her healthcare provider when an infection is about to take hold. This simplifies patient self-monitoring and reduces the frequency of doctor visits, which can ultimately lead to a higher quality of life.

Bonbouton, which is based in New York City, is currently partnering with global insurance company MetLife to determine how its smart insoles will be able to reduce healthcare costs for diabetic foot amputations. In 2018, Bonbouton also announced its technical development agreement with Gore, a company well known for revolutionizing the outerwear industry with GORE-TEX® fabric, to explore ways to integrate Bonbouton’s graphene sensors in comfortable, wearable fabric for digital health applications, including disease management, athletic performance and everyday use.

“We are interested in developing smart clothing for preventative health, and embrace the possibilities of how our graphene technology can be used in other industries,” said Le. “I am excited to realize the full potential of Bonbouton, taking a technology that I developed as a graduate student at Stevens and growing it into a product that will bring seamless preventative care to patients and save billions of dollars in healthcare costs.”

Tags:  Bonbouton  Graphene  Healthcare  Linh Le  Sensors  Stevens Institute of Technology 

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New health monitors are flexible, transparent and graphene enabled

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Wednesday, September 18, 2019

New technological devices are prioritizing non-invasive tracking of vital signs not only for fitness monitoring, but also for the prevention of common health problems such as heart failure, hypertension, and stress related complications, among others. Wearables based on optical detection mechanisms are proving an invaluable approach for reporting on our bodies inner workings and have experienced a large penetration into the consumer market in recent years.

Current wearable technologies, based on non-flexible components, do not deliver the desired accuracy and can only monitor a limited number of vital signs. To tackle this problem, conformable non-invasive optical-based sensors that can measure a broader set of vital signs are at the top of the end-users’ wish list.

In a recent study published in Science Advances ("Flexible graphene photodetectors for wearable fitness monitoring"), ICFO researchers have demonstrated a new class of flexible and transparent wearable devices that are conformable to the skin and can provide continuous and accurate measurements of multiple human vital signs. These devices can measure heart rate, respiration rate and blood pulse oxygenation, as well as exposure to UV radiation from the sun.

While the device measures the different parameters, the read-out is visualized and stored on a mobile phone interface connected to the wearable via Bluetooth. In addition, the device can operate battery-free since it is charged wirelessly through the phone.

“It was very important for us to demonstrate the wide range of potential applications for our advanced light sensing technology through the creation of various prototypes, including the flexible and transparent bracelet, the health patch integrated on a mobile phone and the UV monitoring patch for sun exposure. They have shown to be versatile and efficient due to these unique features”, reports Dr. Emre Ozan Polat, first author of this publication.

The bracelet was fabricated in such a way that it adapts to the skin surface and provides continuous measurement during activity (see Figure 1). The bracelet incorporates a flexible light sensor that can optically record the change in volume of blood vessels, due to the cardiac cycle, and then extract different vital signs such as heart rate, respiration rate and blood pulse oxygenation.

Secondly, the researchers report on the integration of a graphene health patch onto a mobile phone screen, which instantly measures and displays vital signs in real time when a user places one finger on the screen (see Figure 2). A unique feature of this prototype is that the device uses ambient light to operate, promoting low-power-consumption in these integrated wearables and thus, allowing a continuous monitoring of health markers over long periods of time.

ICFO’s advanced light sensing technology has implemented two types of nanomaterials: graphene, a highly flexible and transparent material made of one-atom thick layer of carbon atoms, together with a light absorbing layer made of quantum dots. The demonstrated technology brings a new form factor and design freedom to the wearables’ field, making graphene-quantum-dots-based devices a strong platform for product developers.

 

Dr. Antonios Oikonomou, business developer at ICFO emphasized this by stating that “The booming wearables industry is eagerly looking to increase fidelity and functionality of its offerings. Our graphene-based technology platform answers this challenge with a unique proposition: a scalable, low-power system capable of measuring multiple parameters while allowing the translation of new form factors into products.”

Dr. Stijn Goossens, co-supervisor of the study, also comments that “we have made a breakthrough by showing a flexible, wearable sensing system based on graphene light sensing components. Key was to pick the best of the rigid and flexible worlds. We used the unique benefits of flexible components for vital sign sensing and combined that with the high performance and miniaturization of conventional rigid electronic components.”

Finally, the researchers have been able to demonstrate a broad wavelength detection range with the technology, extending the functionality of the prototypes beyond the visible range. By using the same core technology, they have fabricated a flexible UV patch prototype (see Figure 3) capable of wirelessly transferring both power and data, and operating battery-free to sense the environmental UV-index. continuous monitoring of health markers over long periods of time.

The patch operates with a low power consumption and has a highly efficient UV detection system that can be attached to clothing or skin, and used for monitoring radiation intake from the sun, alerting the wearer of any possible over-exposure.

“We are excited about the prospects for this technology, pointing to a scalable route for the integration of graphene-quantum-dots into fully flexible wearable circuits to enhance form, feel, durability, and performance”, remarks Prof. Frank Koppens, leader of the Quantum Nano-Optoelectronics group at ICFO. “Such results show that this flexible wearable platform is compatible with scalable fabrication processes, proving mass-production of low-cost devices is within reach in the near future.”

Tags:  Antonios Oikonomou  Emre Ozan Polat  Frank Koppens  Graphene  Healthcare  ICFO  nanomaterials  quantum dots  Sensors  Stijn Goossens 

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World’s smallest accelerometer points to new era in wearables, gaming

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Wednesday, September 11, 2019
Updated: Friday, September 6, 2019
In what could be a breakthrough for body sensor and navigation technologies, researchers at KTH have developed the smallest accelerometer yet reported, using the highly conductive nanomaterial, graphene.

Each passing day, nanotechnology and the potential for graphene material make new progress. The latest step forward is a tiny accelerometer made with graphene by an international research team involving KTH Royal Institute of Technology, RWTH Aachen University and Research Institute AMO GmbH, Aachen.

Among the conceivable applications are monitoring systems for cardiovascular diseases and ultra-sensitive wearable and portable motion-capture technologies.

For decades microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have been the basis for new innovations in, for example, medical technology. Now these systems are starting to move to the next level – nano-electromechanical systems, or NEMS.

Xuge Fan, a researcher in the Department for Micro and Nanosystems at KTH, says that the unique material properties of graphene have enabled them to build these ultra-small accelerometers.

“Based on the surveys and comparisons we have made, we can say that this is the smallest reported electromechanical accelerometer in the world,” Fan says. The researchers reported their work in Nature Electronics.

The measure by which any conductor is judged is how easily, and speedily, electrons can move through it. On this point, together with its extraordinary mechanical strength, graphene is one of the most promising materials for a breathtaking array of applications in nano-electromechanical systems.

“We can scale down components because of the material’s atomic-scale thickness, and it has great electrical and mechanical properties,” Fan says. “We created a piezoresistive NEMS accelerometer that is dramatically smaller than any MEMS accelerometers available today, but retains the sensitivity these systems require.”

The future for such small accelerometers is promising, says Fan, who compares advances in nanotechnology to the evolution of smaller and smaller computers.

“This could eventually benefit mobile phones for navigation, mobile games and pedometers, as well as monitoring systems for heart disease and motion-capture wearables that can monitor even the slightest movements of the human body,” he says.

Other potential uses for these NEMS transducers include ultra-miniaturized NEMS sensors and actuators such as resonators, gyroscopes and microphones. In addition, these NEMS transducers can be used as a system to characterize the mechanical and electromechanical properties of graphene, Fan says.

Max Lemme, professor at RWTH, is excited about the results: "Our collaboration with KTH over the years has already shown the potential of graphene membranes for pressure and Hall sensors and microphones. Now we have added accelerometers to the mix. This makes me hopeful to see the material on the market in some years. For this, we are working on industry-compatible manufacturing and integration techniques."

Tags:  AMO GmbH  Electronics  Graphene  KTH Royal Institute of Technology  Max Lemme  RWTH Aachen University  Sensors  Xuge Fan 

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Grolltex Graphene Closes Oversubscribed Private Placement Financing Round

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Wednesday, September 11, 2019
Updated: Tuesday, September 10, 2019

Grolltex (named for ‘graphene-rolling-technologies’) is the largest commercial producer of single layer, ‘electronics grade’ graphene and graphene sensing materials in the U.S. They have announced that it has closed a non-brokered, oversubscribed private placement financing, in the form of a convertible note, with local area private investors. 

The gross proceeds of the private placement will be used for general working capital purposes and for increasing the capacity and quality testing capabilities of the company’s production facility in San Diego, California.


The company is focused on delivering inexpensive and enabling solutions to advanced nano-device and graphene sensor makers by fabricating the highest quality single layer graphene attainable, via chemical vapor deposition (or ‘CVD’).

The company is now capable of producing monolayer graphene sensors on large area plastic sheets at a cost of pennies per unit, in a high throughput and sustainable way.  Further, Grolltex is helping customers that currently produce their graphene sensors on silicon wafers, to transition that production capacity to making their sensors on large area sheets of biodegradable plastic instead, at a >100X cost savings. 

Monolayer graphene films are today seen as the most promising futuristic sensing materials for their combination of surface to volume ratio (the film is only one atom thick) and conductivity (the most conductive substance known at room temperature). Markets that are commercializing advanced sensors made of graphene include DNA sensing and editing, new drug discovery and wearable bio-monitors for glucose sensing and autonomous blood pressure monitoring via patches or watch-like wearable bracelet devices.

No securities were issued and no cash was paid as bonuses, finders’ fees, compensation or commissions in connection with the private placement.

Tags:  Biosensor  CVD  Graphene  Groltex  Sensors 

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Graphene IP Portfolio Made Available

Posted By Dexter Johnson, IEEE Spectrum, Tuesday, August 6, 2019
Updated: Thursday, August 1, 2019


Seattle, WA-based Allied Inventors (AI) is a $600M fund that has invested in early-stage technologies to help address industrial challenges. AI manages over 5,000 intellectual property assets in technology areas such as graphene, medical platforms, energy storage, and semiconductors. 

Now AI is looking to monetize its graphene IP portfolio consisting of 87 patents and pending applications through licenses or sale of the patent package. Over 91% of the patent portfolio has been granted in multiple jurisdictions including the US, China, Germany Japan, and India.

AI curated their technology portfolio by partnering with a large network of inventors from well-known universities, research institutions, and companies. In developing its graphene IP portfolio, AI sourced novel technologies relevant to producing quality large scale graphene, detecting graphene defects, and using graphene for a variety of applications.  The resulting IP portfolio consists of patents related to graphene manufacture and graphene applications like batteries, filtration, and nanoparticle composites. 

In one manufacturing process patent (US Patent 8,828,193 and 14/459,860), this technology is an electromagnetic radiation process that can operate at low temperatures and offers a way to rapidly produce graphene from graphite oxide on an industrial scale. Another patent (US Patent 15/313,855) involves the process of and system for converting carbon dioxide into graphene by focusing light beam on it.

In addition to graphene manufacturing patents, the portfolio includes technologies for making graphene-based materials. One of the patents (US Patent 9,944,774) is a simple and cost-effective process for forming graphene wrapped carbon nanotube based polymer composites. These composites can be used for strain sensing applications such as structural health monitoring.

Another patent (US Patent 9,499,410) describes a method for making metal oxide-graphene composites. The technology is based on a solvo-thermal process that can synthesize a variety of metal oxide-graphene composites. It is a simple one-step method for use in applications such as batteries and capacitors. 

“Our carefully-curated graphene portfolio has a wide range of important technologies for the manufacture and application of high quality graphene. This portfolio would be beneficial to companies in the graphene space that are interested in enhancing the value of their technology portfolio,” said Norman Ong, Business Analyst for AI. “While the preference is to monetize the entire IP portfolio, we would be open to exploring different options.” 

Ong invites any organization that is interested in the graphene IP portfolio to visit their website and to contact them directly at info@alliedinventors.com.

 

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DISCLOSURE: The Graphene Council has NO INTEREST in the referenced patents and has no financial gain from the sale or license of any of the above referenced patents. This article is provided for informational purposes only and you are requested to contact the patent owners directly. 

Tags:  batteries  graphene production  Investment  sensors 

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Laser-induced graphene composites are eminently wearable

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Monday, June 24, 2019
Graphene has a unique combination of properties that is ideal for next-generation electronics, including mechanical flexibility, high electrical conductivity, and chemical stability. The burgeoning field of wearable electronics – 'smart' fabrics with invisibly integrated energy harvesting, energy storage, electronics and sensor systems – benefits from graphene in numerous ways. Graphene materials, be they pristine or composites, will lead to smaller high-capacity and fast-charging supercapacitors, completely flexible and even rollable electronics and energy-storage devices, and transparent batteries.

To realize the commercial potential of graphene, it is necessary to develop reliable, cost-effective and facile processes for the industry-scale fabrication of graphene-based devices.

One possible route is inkjet printing, already extensively demonstrated with conductive metal nanoparticle inks. Although liquid-phase graphene dispersions have been demonstrated, researchers are still struggling with sophisticated inkjet printing technologies that allow efficient and reliable mass production of high-quality graphene patterns for practical applications.

A novel solution comes from the team at Joseph Wang's Laboratory for Nanobioelectronics at UC San Diego. Reporting their findings in Advanced Materials Technologies ("Laser-Induced Graphene Composites for Printed, Stretchable, and Wearable Electronics"), they demonstrate the synthesis of high-performance stretchable graphene ink using a facile, scalable, and low-cost laser induction method for the synthesis of the graphene component.

As a proof-of-concept, the researchers fabricated a stretchable micro-supercapacitor (S-MSC) demonstrating the highest capacitance reported for a graphene-based highly stretchable MSC to date. This also is the first example of using laser-induced graphene in the form for a powder preparation of graphene-based inks and subsequently for use in screen-printing of S-MSC.

Back in 2014, researchers at Rice University created flexible, patterned sheets of multilayer graphene from a cheap polymer by burning it with a computer-controlled laser, a technique they called laser-induced graphene (LIG). This high-yield and low-cost graphene synthesis process works in air at room temperature and eliminates the need for hot furnaces and controlled environments, and it makes graphene that is suitable for electronics or energy storage.

"LIG can be prepared from a few polymeric substances, such as Kapton polyimide and polyetherimide, as well as various sustainable biomasses, including wood, lignin, cloth, paper, or hydrothermal carbons," Farshad Tehrani, the paper's first author. "On the other hand, LIG has considerably enhanced dispersion in typical solvent and binders due to its inherently abundant defects and surface functional groups."

He points out that the team's novel method, while maintaining the distinct advantages of the direct-written LIG, unlocks untapped potentials of the LIG material in several areas:

Mechanical stretchability: In this study, the inherently brittle and mechanically fragile LIG electrodes are turned into a mechanically robust, highly stretchable electrodes, with the new ink attractive for diverse wearable electronic devices.

Enhanced electrochemical performance: The areal capacitance of the team's S-MSC has far surpassed that of direct-written laser LIG and has produced the highest areal capacitance reported for highly stretchable supercapacitors.

Customized composite formulations: The basic ink formulation is compatible with a wide range of compositions using the LIG as an attractive conductive filler.

Substrate versatility: Unlike direct-laser writing, which is limited to polymeric substrates and several biomasses, the LIG ink can be printed on almost any stretchable and non stretchable substrate, such as polymeric substrates, fabrics, or textiles.

"During the development of our new supercapacitor, we discovered a specific synergic effect between polymeric binders poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) mixed with Polyurethane (PU), PEDOT:PSS-PU and graphene sheets in producing exceptional electromechanical performances," adds Fernando Soto, a co-author of the paper. "We realized that when both sides of the graphene sheets are thoroughly covered with the conductive/elastic PEDOT:PSS/PU polymer, it results in a robust composite that withstands severe shear stresses during stretching."

"Not only that, but it also maintains above 85% of its electrochemical performance such as its charge storing capacitance properties, composite conductivity and electrochemical stability at high charge-discharge cycles," he adds.

In developing wearable electronic devices, researchers need to deal with a range of issues where stretchability and mechanical performance of the device is as important as its electronic properties such as conductivity, charge storage properties and, generally, its high electrochemical performance.

Rather than focusing on one of these specific problems, the team's work addresses a series of challenges that include high mechanical and electrochemical performance while keeping the costs at their lowest possible point for realistic commercialization scenarios.

"From the design to the implementation stages of our study, the primary focus has been devoted to scalability, versatility and cost efficiency of a high performance platform that can potentially spark further innovations using nanocomposite materials in the field of wearable electronics," notes Tehrani.

The next stages of the team's work in this area of wearable applications will see the integration of these high-performance S-MSCs with batteries and energy harvesting systems such as biofuel cells, triboelectrics, and piezoelectrics.

Tags:  Farshad Tehrani  Graphene  Joseph Wang  nanocomposites  nanoelectronics  Sensors  UC San Diego 

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Gratomic Launches its first production of graphene from Gratomic Graphite Derived Product

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Thursday, May 30, 2019
Updated: Saturday, May 25, 2019

Gratomic Inc. has announced its first graphene from Gratomic Graphite derived product. Gratomic graphenes derived from Gratomic graphite mined from its Aukum Mine located in Namibia are being used to manufacture Graphene enabled conductive inks and pastes. The inks and pastes (to the best of the Company's knowledge) are amongst the most conductive carbon inks and pastes currently available within the global market place.

The Gratink product is formulated specifically to meet the needs of the printed flexible electronics and EMI shielding markets. Electromagnetic interference (EMI), sometimes referred to as radio-frequency interference (RFI) is a disturbance generated by an external source that affects an electrical circuit by electromagnetic induction, electrostatic coupling, or conduction.

The Gratink and paste applications based on surface modified nano graphene "enablers" offer a product for market penetration into the information technology sector that is now an important aspect of our everyday life.  

The Gratomic Gratink product delivers a functional print and coat component solution.

Due to a multiple range of potential applications including antennas, RFID tags, transistors, sensors, and wearable electronics, the development of printed conductive inks and coatings for electronic applications is growing rapidly. Currently available conductive inks exploit metal nanoparticles to realize electrical conductivity.

Traditionally, metallic nanoparticles are normally derived from silver, copper and platinum based enablers which can be expensive and easily oxidized.

The Gratink product is designed to fill a gap in both the flexible printed electronics and EMI market space where metallic nanoparticle solutions are unnecessary.

Gratink is initially available to meet customer printing and coating preference specifications for R&D purposes with orders available in one-kilo packages.

Following satisfactory customer preproduction qualification, the products can then be varied so they are suitable for printing and coating in bulk quantities formulated to specification and made available as required in 10's to 100's of kilos or tonnes.

Please note - Inks and pastes are prepared for all currently available methods of printing and coating with the exception of ink jet printing.

Sheldon Inwentash Co-CEO of Gratomic commented. "Gratomic is delighted to offer their first product of a planned product range based on the Company's graphene derived from graphite mined from its Aukum Mine."

Gratink is a collaborative development product formulated in tandem with Perpetuus Carbon Technology Wales UK and Gratomic Inc.

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Are you interested in developing graphene enhanced products or applications?

Find a suitable application partner / supplier through The Graphene Council 

Tags:  coatings  Graphene  Graphite  Gratomic  nanoparticles  Perpetuus Carbon Technologies  Sensors  Sheldon Inwentash 

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Grolltex Ships ‘World’s Smallest Graphene Strain Sensor’ to Large European Partner

Posted By Graphene Council, The Graphene Council, Tuesday, May 14, 2019
Grolltex, has shipped the first version of its patented single atom thick strain sensor to a large European sensor maker partner. The company calls this sensor device, ‘the smallest, most sensitive sensor in the world’ as the base sensing material is only one atom thick and the sensor performance is such that it is capable of measuring the contractive strength of individual heart cells called ‘cardiomyocytes’, providing an important parameter on heart cell health.

“Our strain sensor is very versatile because it is small, flexible, robust and with a gauge factor of up to 1300, it is incredibly sensitive. This means it can be used in a wide variety of applications”, said Jeff Draa, Grolltex CEO. “For example, it can be layered into the skins of airplanes to sense micro stress in the fuselage or be used as a wearable blood pressure monitor in a skin patch configuration. The prototype we delivered to our European partner was designed to measure any environmental pressure or strain that a silicon microchip might experience while sitting in its packaging. This can be important information for many defense or autonomous vehicle related device designs”.

Grolltex, short for ‘graphene-rolling-technologies’, is the largest commercial producer of single layer or electronics grade graphene in North America. The company is lately focusing more of its efforts on servicing sensor markets in the life science and biology areas and seeing continually more adoption of graphene as a sensing material for such uses as DNA sequencing and new drug discovery. Monolayer graphene films are today seen as the most promising futuristic sensing materials for their combination of surface to volume ratio (the film is only one atom thick) and its conductivity (the most conductive substance known at room temperature). 

“For advanced sensor makers that operate at the nano-scale, there is no better material to design your device with than single layer graphene”, said Draa. “The applications and devices that our customers are designing with this material are enabling many previously unobtainable measurements and single layer graphene is now available and affordable for industrialization”. Grolltex makes the raw materials for nano-sensing as well as designing specific sensor devices and packaging for many critical, next generation applications. “We are seeing an explosion of activity in the micro-sensing world as sensor makers are picking up on the versatility and measurement performance benefits of this single atom thick material”.

Tags:  Graphene  Grolltex  Jeff Draa  Nanosensors  sensors 

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