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Prize fund available for novel applications of graphene and other 2D materials

Posted By Graphene Council, Tuesday, March 31, 2020
The Masood Enterprise Centre has opened its annual Eli & Britt Harari Graphene Enterprise Award competition, which offers a £70,000 prize fund for novel ideas involving graphene and other 2D materials that have the potential to be commercialised.

This prestigious award, in association with Nobel Laureate Sir Andre Geim, is awarded each year to help the implementation of commercially-viable business proposals from students, post-doctoral researchers and recent graduates of The University of Manchester based on developing the commercial prospects of graphene and other 2D materials.

The award acts as seed funding to enable budding entrepreneurs to take the first steps towards turning their novel idea into a reality. It recognises the impact that high-level, flexible, early-stage financial support has in the successful development of a business.

Prizes of £50,000 and £20,000 will be awarded to the individuals or teams who can best demonstrate how their technology relating to graphene and other 2D materials can be applied to a viable commercial opportunity.

Last year saw winning teams address key societal challenges on future energy and food security. They sought breakthroughs by using 2D materials to produce hydrogen to generate energy, and by designing polymer hydrogels to increase food production.

As in previous years, winners will also receive valuable tailored support from groups across our University, including the new state-of-the-art R&D facility, the Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre (GEIC); its leading support infrastructure for entrepreneurs, the Masood Enterprise Centre; as well as wider networks to help the winners take the first steps towards commercialising these early-stage ideas.

The award is co-funded by the North American Foundation for The University of Manchester through the support of one of our University’s former physics students, Dr Eli Harari, founder of global flash-memory giant, SanDisk, and his wife, Britt. It recognises the role that high-level, flexible, early-stage financial support can play in the successful development of a business targeting the full commercialisation of a product or technology related to research in graphene and 2D materials.

Tags:  2D materials  Eli Harari  Graphene  Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre  SanDisk  The Masood Enterprise Centre  University of Manchester 

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The National Graphene Institute: Five years on

Posted By Graphene Council, Friday, March 20, 2020
A day that not only saw a solar eclipse, Friday, 20 March 2015, marked the start of a materials revolution: the opening of the National Graphene Institute (NGI). Since it opened its doors the NGI has played host to some of the world’s most famous faces and set the ball rolling in the advancement of graphene and other two-dimensional materials.

With its unique architectural design the NGI was designed to allow industry and academics to work side by side on new and exciting ideas.

Five years on we take a look at some of the highlights.

2015

No sooner had the paint had dried, did we see the first graphene product: the launch of the graphene lightbulb. This demonstrated the practical uses of graphene and how it could be translated into everyday products.

In June, Manchester hosted the Graphene Flagship’s Graphene Week. The world’s largest graphene and related 2D materials conference. It also included the premiere of Graphene Suite, commissioned by Brighter Sound, the NGI’s composer in residence Sara Lowes collaborated with Professor Cinzia Casirgahi and fellow researchers to create a six-part piece which explored the relationship between science and music.

October saw President Xi Jinping of the People’s Republic of China visit the NGI. He saw the some of the latest developments in graphene applications and took at tour of the world-class facilities.

To conclude the year, the NGI was crowned Major Building Project of the Year at the annual British Construction Industry Awards. Designed by Jestico & Whiles, the NGI fought off strong competition from six other shortlisted schemes including the Weston Library at Oxford University, Five Pancras Square at Kings Cross and the Brooks Building at Manchester Metropolitan University.

2016
The city of Manchester played host to the EuroScience Open Forum (ESOF) and held the title of European City of Science throughout 2016. To coincide with this, partnering with the Science and Industry Museum, the first graphene exhibition was launched: Wonder Materials: Graphene and beyond. Looking into the past, present and future, this turnkey exhibition brought graphene to life, taking visitors on an immersive journey inside laboratory clean rooms and stimulating learning environments. The exhibition then went tour to Hong Kong.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited the NGI in October. Amongst visiting graphene researchers and taking a tour of the impressive cleanrooms, The Duke and Duchess also celebrated the University’s Manchester Engineering Campus Development (MECD).

2017
An ultralight high-performance mechanical watch made with graphene was unveiled in January thanks to a unique collaboration. The University of Manchester collaborated with watchmaking brand Richard Mille and McLaren F1 to create the world’s lightest mechanical chronograph by pairing leading graphene research with precision engineering.

April saw a scientific breakthrough when a team of researchers led by Professor Rahul Raveendran Nair, developed a graphene oxide membrane which was able to filter out common salts. Known as a ‘graphene sieve’ this demonstrated real-world potential of providing clean drinking water for millions of people who struggle to access adequate clean water sources. The team have gone on to turn whisky clear and produce membranes for oil separation.

2018
Sprinting into 2018 the first graphene running shoes were launched. Collaborating with inov-8, the brand has been able to develop a graphene-enhanced rubber. Rubber outsoles were developed that in testing outlasted 1,000 miles and were scientifically proven to be 50% harder wearing.

A new national graphene characterisation service was launched, in partnership with the National Physical Laboratory. The service, allows companies to understand the properties of graphene and was established to accelerate the industrialisation of graphene in the UK – forging the missing link between graphene research and development, and its application in next generation products.

The summer also saw Newcastle host the Great Exhibition of the North. Once again we partnered with Brighter Sound to launch The Hexagon Experiment. Music, art and science collided in an explosive celebration of women’s creativity. The Hexagon Experiment featured live music, conversations and original commissions from some of the North’s most exciting musicians and scientists.

2019
News of the ‘graphene sieve’ attracted global attention in 2017, which led to Lifesaver partnering with the NGI. The 18 month project focuses on developing graphene technology that can be used for enhanced water filtration, with the goal of creating a proprietary and patented, cutting-edge product capable of eliminating an even wider range of hazardous contaminants than currently removed by its existing high performance ultra-filtration process.

2019 also saw the first operational year of the Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre. Focusing on the rapid development and scale up of graphene and two dimensional materials. Together, the NGI and GEIC provide an unrivalled critical mass of graphene expertise and infrastructure. The two facilities reinforce Manchester's position as a globally leading knowledge-base in graphene research and commercialisation.

Tags:  2D materials  Graphene  Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre  Graphene Flagship  National Graphene Institute  University of Manchester 

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How impermeable is the impermeable graphene?

Posted By Graphene Council, Friday, March 13, 2020
New experiments by researchers at The University of Manchester have placed the best limits yet on impermeability of graphene and other two-dimensional materials to gases and liquids. The work has also revealed that the carbon sheet can act as a powerful catalyst for hydrogen splitting, a finding that promises cheap and abundant catalysts in the future.

Graphene theoretically boasts a very high energy for the penetration of atoms and molecule, which prevents any gases and liquids from passing through it at room temperature. Indeed, it is estimated that it would take longer than the lifetime of the Universe to find an atom energetic enough to pierce a defect-free monolayer graphene of any realistic size under ambient conditions, say the researchers led by Professor Sir Andre Geim. This hypothesis is supported by real-world experiments performed over a decade ago which found that one-atom-thick graphene was less permeable to helium atoms than a quartz film of a few microns in thickness. Although the film is 100,000 thicker than graphene, this is still very far from the theoretical limit.

Perfectly sealed containers

The Manchester team developed a measurement technique that is many billion times more sensitive to permeating gas atoms than any of the known methods. In their study, reported in Nature, they began by drilling micron-sized wells in monocrystals of graphite or boron nitride, which they covered with a one-atom-thick graphene membrane. Since the top surface of these containers is atomically flat, the cover provides a perfect air-tight seal. The only way that atoms and molecules can enter a container is through the graphene membrane. The membrane itself is flexible and responds to minor changes in pressure inside the container.

The researchers then placed the containers in helium gas. If atoms enter or exit a container, the gas pressure inside increases or decreases, respectively, and makes the surface of the cover bulge over some small distances. The team monitored these movements with angstrom precision using an atomic force microscope.

The new result backs up (and provides an explanation for) some of the previous reports in the literature on graphene’s unexpectedly high catalytic activity, which was particularly counterintuitive because of the extreme inertness of its bulk parent, graphite, Professor Sir Andre Geim.

Like a “one-kilometre-thick wall of glass”

From changes in the membrane position, the number of atoms or molecules penetrating through graphene can be calculated precisely. The researchers found that no more than a few helium atoms - if any - entered or exited their container per hour. “This sensitivity is more than eight to nine orders of magnitude higher than achieved in previous experiments on graphene impermeability, which themselves were a few orders of magnitude more sensitive than the detection limit of modern helium leak detectors. To put this into perspective, one-atom-thick carbon is less permeable to gases than a one-kilometre-thick wall of glass”, explains Geim.

Hydrogen anomaly

Helium is the most permeating of all gases, because of its small weakly interacting atoms. Nonetheless, the researchers decided to repeat their experiments with other gases such as neon, nitrogen, oxygen, argon, krypton, xenon and hydrogen. All of them showed no permeation with the same accuracy as achieved for helium, except for hydrogen. In contrast to all the others, it permeated relatively rapidly through defect-free graphene. Dr Pengzhan Sun, the first author of the Nature paper, commented “This is a shocking result: A hydrogen molecule is much larger than a helium atom. If the latter cannot pass through, how on earth larger molecules can”.

Curved graphene for hydrogen dissociation

The team attributes the unexpected hydrogen permeation to the fact that graphene membranes are not completely flat but have a lot of nanometre-sized ripples. Those act as catalytically active regions and dissociate absorbed molecular hydrogen into two hydrogen atoms, a reaction that is usually hugely unfavourable. Graphene ripples favour the hydrogen splitting, in agreement with theory. Then, the adsorbed hydrogen atoms can flip to the other side of the graphene membranes with a relative ease, similarly to permeation of protons through defect-free graphene. The latter process was known before and explained by the fact that protons are subatomic particles, small enough to squeeze through the dense crystal lattice of graphene.

“The new result backs up (and provides an explanation for) some of the previous reports in the literature on graphene’s unexpectedly high catalytic activity, which was particularly counterintuitive because of the extreme inertness of its bulk parent, graphite,” says Geim.

“Our work provides a basis for understanding why graphene can work as a catalyst -- something that should stimulate further research on using the material in such applications in the future,” Dr Sun adds. “In a sense, graphene nanoripples behave like platinum particles, which are also known to split molecular hydrogen. But no one expected this from seemingly inert graphene”.

Tags:  Andre Geim  Graphene  Pengzhan Sun  University of Manchester 

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Oil separation made easier with 2D material membrane

Posted By Graphene Council, Friday, February 28, 2020
University of Manchester researchers have made a leap forward in overcoming one of the biggest problems in membrane technology- membrane fouling.

Membrane-based separations are essential for various processes, such as water filtration and oil and gas separation. The use of graphene and other 2D materials in membrane technology has attracted significant attention due to the tunability of these materials making it possible to filter impurities previously not thought possible.

Fouling is an inevitable event in membrane separation, where blockages occur in the pores of a membrane, stopping the flow and preventing the membrane from functioning normally. Fouling is an especially severe issue for oil separation technology due to how easily the oil droplets stick onto the membrane surface.

Published in Nature Communications, the team based in the Department of Chemical Engineering & Analytical Science, Henry Royce Institute and the National Graphene Institute in collaboration with University College London (UCL), have demonstrated that the exfoliated two-dimensional form of vermiculite, a natural clay mineral, can be used as a fouling resistant coating for oil-water separation.

It is well known that increasing the water wettability and decreasing the oil adhesion on a membrane can reduce membrane fouling due to oil deposition. The scientific community has in the past mainly focused on tuning the surface charge of the membrane by chemical modification to enhance the water wettability and hence reduce fouling. These attempts have succeeded in part, but long-term antifouling properties were yet to be attained.

Now the team at The University of Manchester have found that the wetting properties of vermiculite membranes, prepared by stacking many layers of two-dimensional vermiculite sheets, can be tuned from super-hydrophilic to hydrophobic simply by exchanging the cations present on the surface and between the layers of vermiculite.

Developing antifouling membranes for oil-water separation is a long-sought objective for scientists and technologists, which is evident from the rapid growth in the number of publications in this area, Professor Rahul Raveendran Nair.

Further, the team also demonstrated how to exploit this unusual property for reducing the membrane fouling during oil-water filtration by using superhydrophilic lithium exchanged vermiculite (lithium vermiculite) as a coating layer for commercial microfiltration membranes.

Dr Kun Huang, the lead author of the paper said: “Lithium vermiculite membranes not only provide superhydrophilicity but also repel oil droplets during filtration due to their underwater superoleophobic property. The under-water oil adhesion on vermiculite coated microfiltration membranes was more than 40 times lower than the noncoated membrane.”

The demonstrated oil-water separation is just one example of the use of super-hydrophilic antifouling membranes. Their application could be expanded to other areas such as developing self-cleaning surfaces, and antifouling filters for biofiltration.

Professor Rahul Raveendran Nair said: “Developing antifouling membranes for oil-water separation is a long-sought objective for scientists and technologists, which is evident from the rapid growth in the number of publications in this area. We believe our work provides a major advance in the fundamental understanding of wetting properties of solids down to the molecular level and is a notable milestone in the development of robust fouling resistant membrane technologies.”

The work was done in collaboration with scientists from the Department of Physics & Astronomy at UCL to probe the mechanism of the unusual water wetting transition in the vermiculite membrane upon ion exchange.

Patrick Rowe, from UCL said: “Our study shows how the atomic-scale details of the interaction between water molecules, surfaces and ions are important for understanding the surface properties of solids. The high water affinity and hence lower oil droplet interaction of the lithium vermiculite is due to the unique arrangement of water molecules on the surface of lithium vermiculite.”

Dr. Christie Cherian, who co-authored the paper said, “The presence of ions in the vermiculite membrane helped to pin the water molecules firmly on the surface even when the membrane is exposed to oil for a prolonged period of time, a property unique to the vermiculite coated membrane, shows promise for using it as a long-term antifouling coating.

Tags:  2D materials  Christie Cherian  Graphene  Henry Royce Institute  Kun Huang  Patrick Rowe  Rahul Raveendran Nair  University College London  University of Manchester 

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Universities Minister celebrates Manchester’s materials reputation

Posted By Graphene Council, Wednesday, January 22, 2020
Advanced Materials were at the centre of the agenda for the Minister for Universities, Science, Research and Innovation, Chris Skidmore, last week during a thorough tour of The University of Manchester campus.

The Minister visited the University to discover more about the soon-to-open Henry Royce Institute, hear about the most recent graphene developments, discover more about how the AI and robotics are helping to solve challenges faced by the nuclear industry and finally tour the north campus and future home of IDManchester.

During the tour, the Minister, who was accompanied by President and Vice-Chancellor, Professor Dame Nancy Rothwell, met with leading academics and discussed breakthrough developments at the University since he last visited the campus just over a year ago.

Professor Phil Withers greeted the Minister to discuss and take-in the the new soon-to-open £150m Royce building, a new national hub for advanced materials research and commercialisation.

During the visit Chris Skidmore said: “The University of Manchester is doing amazing research in areas like x-ray imaging systems and the super material graphene. Outstanding university research like this will help build our reputation as a global science superpower while growing our economy, and it was a privilege to witness it first-hand.”

The University of Manchester is doing amazing research in areas like x-ray imaging systems and the super material graphene. Outstanding university research like this will help build our reputation as a global science superpower while growing our economy, and it was a privilege to witness it first-hand, Chris Skidmore, Minister of State for Universities, Science, Research and Innovation.

The delegation then visited state-of-the-art research facilities of the National Graphene Institute (NGI) with Professor Sir Andre Geim, who received a Nobel Prize for his work on initially isolating the two-dimensional (2D) material in 2004 and continues to explore and develop the untapped potential of related 2D materials in Manchester.

The NGI, along the with Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre (GEIC) forms the heart of Graphene City, an entire city-centre based end-to-end ecosystem to research, develop and commercialise unique graphene applications in tandem with industry.

A tour of the Manchester Institute of Biotechnology (MIB) was also on the agenda to visit the labs at the heart of the pioneering research led by Professor Nigel Scrutton and team which was recently honoured with the Queen's Anniversary Prize. The MIB was singled out as a beacon of excellence for being at the forefront of designing a sustainable future for the UK and communities across the world by developing disruptive bio-based technologies.

The visit concluded with the Minister heading to the RAIN project which uses robotic and AI technologies to solve challenges faced by the nuclear industry. It is led by Barry Lennox, Professor of Applied Control in the School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering,

Tags:  2D materials  Chris Skidmore  Dame Nancy Rothwell  Graphene  Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre  Phil Withers  University of Manchester 

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New Chair in Materials Physics and Innovation Policy

Posted By Graphene Council, Tuesday, January 21, 2020
The University of Manchester has appointed Richard Jones as a new Chair in Materials Physics and Innovation Policy, joining Manchester from the University of Sheffield.

Richard is an experimental soft matter physicist. His first degree and PhD in Physics both come from Cambridge University. Following postdoctoral work at Cornell University, USA, he was a lecturer at the University of Cambridge’s Cavendish Laboratory, before moving to Sheffield in 1998. In 2006 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society, in recognition of his work in the field of polymers and biopolymers at surfaces and interfaces, and in 2009 he won the Tabor Medal of the UK’s Institute of Physics for his contributions to nanoscience.

He is the author of more than 190 research papers, and three books, Polymers at Surfaces and Interfaces (with Randal Richards, CUP 1999), Soft Condensed Matter, (OUP 2002), and Soft Machines: Nanotechnology and Life (OUP 2004).

He was Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Research and Innovation at Sheffield from 2009 to 2016, was a member of EPSRC Council from 2013 – 2018, and chaired Research England’s Technical Advisory Group for the Knowledge Exchange Framework. He has written extensively about science and innovation policy, and was a member of the Sheffield/Manchester Industrial Strategy Commission.

Richard will join the Faculty of Science and Engineering and contribute to the pioneering work in advanced materials that is currently being carried out at Manchester. The University is home to several major national materials research centres including the National Graphene Institute, the Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre and the soon-to-open Henry Royce Institute for advanced materials research and innovation.

Richard is a greatly respected materials physicist who has also made very significant contributions to major national and international activities and to the areas of regional economic growth, productivity and prosperity. I am delighted that he will be joining us, President and Vice-Chancellor, Professor Dame Nancy Rothwell.

Richard said: “Manchester is one of the world’s great universities, whose research in many fields, including advanced materials, has international reach. In addition to its national importance, it plays a central role in driving economic growth and prosperity in the city and across the North of England. This is an exciting time to join The University of Manchester and I’m looking forward to being part of this important work.”

Professor Dame Nancy Rothwell, President and Vice-Chancellor of The University of Manchester said: “Richard is a greatly respected materials physicist who has also made very significant contributions to major national and international activities and to the areas of regional economic growth, productivity and prosperity. I am delighted that he will be joining us.”

Professor Martin Schröder, Vice President and Dean of the University’s Faculty of Science and Engineering, added: “I am thrilled and delighted to welcome Professor Richard Jones to the University.

“Richard is a renowned experimental physicist with a focus on materials science, specialising in the properties at surfaces and interfaces. Richard has wider interests in the social and economic consequences of nanotechnology and has contributed significantly to innovation within the higher education sector. I very much look forward to working with Richard and developing and delivering new initiatives across science and engineering.”

Tags:  Dame Nancy Rothwell  Graphene  Martin Schröder  Richard Jones  University of Manchester 

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Mayor praises Manchester model of innovation as graphene applications gain real pace

Posted By Graphene Council, Monday, January 13, 2020
Andy Burnham, Mayor for Greater Manchester, made a fact-finding tour of facilities that are pioneering graphene innovation at The University of Manchester.

The Mayor toured the Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre (GEIC) which is an industry-facing facility specialising in the rapid development and scale up of graphene and other 2D materials applications.

As well as state-of-the art labs and equipment, the Mayor was also shown examples of commercialisation – including the world’s first-ever sports shoes to use graphene which has been produced by specialist sports footwear company inov-8 who are based in the North.

Andy Burnham – a running enthusiast who has previously participated in a number of marathons – has promised to put a pair of graphene trainers to the test and feedback his own experiences to researchers based at The University of Manchester.

Manchester is the home of graphene - and when you see the brilliant work and the products now being developed with the help of the Graphene@Manchester team it’s clear why this city-region maintains global leadership in research and innovation around this fantastic advanced material, Andy Burnham, Greater Manchester Mayor.

By collaborating with graphene experts in Manchester, inov-8 has been able to develop a graphene-enhanced rubber which they now use for outsoles in a new range of running and fitness shoes. In testing, the groundbreaking G-SERIES shoes have outlasted 1,000 miles and are scientifically proven to be 50% stronger, 50% more elastic and 50% harder wearing.

“Manchester is the home of graphene - and when you see the brilliant work and the products now being developed with the help of the Graphene@Manchester team it’s clear why this city-region maintains global leadership in research and innovation around this fantastic advanced material,” said Andy Burnham.

“I have been very impressed with the exciting model of innovation the University has pioneered in our city-region, with the Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre playing a vital role by working with its many business partners to take breakthrough science from the lab and apply it to real world challenges.

“And thanks to world firsts, like the graphene running shoe, the application of graphene is now gaining real pace. In fact, the experts say we are approaching a tipping point for graphene commercialisation – and this is being led right here in Greater Manchester.”

Tags:  2D materials  Andy Burnham  Graphene  Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre  inov-8  sporting goods  University of Manchester 

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Energy levels in electrons of 2D materials are mapped for the first time

Posted By Graphene Council, Thursday, January 9, 2020
Researchers based at the National Graphene Institute at The University of Manchester have developed an innovative measurement method that allows, for the first time, the mapping of the energy levels of electrons in the conduction band of semiconducting 2D materials.

Writing in Nature Communications, a team led by Dr Roman Gorbachev reports the first precise mapping of the conduction band of 2D indium selenide (InSe) using resonant tunnelling spectroscopy, to access the previously unexplored part of the electronic structure. They observed multiple subbands for both electrons and holes and tracked their evolution with the number of atomic layers in InSe.

Many emerging technologies rely on novel semiconductor structures, where the motion of electrons is restricted in one or more directions. Such confinement is in the nature of 2D materials and it is responsible for many of their new and exciting properties.

For instance, the colour of the emitted light shifts towards shorter wavelengths as they get thinner, analogous to quantum dots changing colour when their size is varied. As another consequence, the allowed energy available for the electrons in such materials, called conduction and valence bands, split into multiple subbands.

We hope this study will pave the way for exploration of intersubband transitions and lead to development of prototype optoelectronic devices with tuneable emission in the challenging terahertz range, Dr Roman Gorbachev.

Optical transitions between such subbands present a large potential for real-life applications as they provide optically active in terahertz and far-infrared ranges, which can be employed for security and communication technologies as light emitters or detectors.

Dr Roman Gorbachev said: “We hope this study will pave the way for exploration of intersubband transitions and lead to development of prototype optoelectronic devices with tuneable emission in the challenging terahertz range.”

Tags:  2D materials  Graphene  optoelectronics  Roman Gorbachev  Semiconductor  University of Manchester 

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Researcher’s break the geometric limitations of moiré pattern in graphene heterostructures

Posted By Graphene Council, Wednesday, January 1, 2020
Researchers at The University of Manchester have uncovered interesting phenomena when multiple two-dimensional materials are combined into van der Waals heterostructures (layered ‘sandwiches’ of different materials).

These heterostructures are sometimes compared to Lego bricks – where the individual blocks represent different atomically thin crystals, such as graphene, and stacked on top of each other to form new devices.

Published in Science Advances, the team focus on how the different crystals begin to alter one another’s fundamental properties when brought into such close proximity. Of particular interest is when two crystals closely match and a moiré pattern forms. This moiré pattern has been shown to affect a range of properties in an increasing list of 2D materials. However, typically the geometry of the moiré pattern places a restriction on the nature and size of the effect.

A moiré pattern is due to the mismatch and rotation between the layers of each materials which produces a geometric pattern similar to a kaleidoscope.

Our results push through the geometric limitation for these systems and therefore present new opportunities to see more of such science, as well as new avenues for applications.
Zihao Wang and Colin Woods, School of Natural Science

The team have broken this restriction by combining moiré patterns into composite ‘super-moiré’ in graphene both aligning to substrate and encapsulation hexagonal boron nitride. The researchers demonstrate the nature of these composite super-moiré lattices by showing band structure modifications in graphene in the low-energy regime. Furthermore, they suggest that the results could provide new directions for research and devices fabrication.

Zihao Wang and Colin Woods authors of the paper said: “In recent years moiré pattern have allowed the observation of many exciting physical phenomena, from new long-lived excitonic states, Hofstadter’s Butterfly, and superconductivity.

Our results push through the geometric limitation for these systems and therefore present new opportunities to see more of such science, as well as new avenues for applications.”

Tags:  2D materials  Colin Woods  Graphene  hexagonal boron nitride  University of Manchester  Zihao Wang 

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Graphene Industry Showcase in Manchester

Posted By Graphene Council, Monday, December 16, 2019

This week Graphene@Manchester hosted a jam-packed two-day (10-11 December) event showcasing the hottest topics in the field of graphene.

The event saw over 100 delegates take to Manchester for a chance to find out how they can benefit from working with the one-atom-thick material.

Featuring talks from BAC, inov-8 and Lifesaver, delegates were able to witness first hand the practical applications of graphene and 2D materials.

The showcase also featured an exhibition of some of the newest products and prototypes using the revolutionary material such as water filtration devices and hydrogels used for crop production to suitcases and doormats as well as the BAC Mono R- the first production car to use graphene-enhanced carbon fibre in each body panel.

Delegates also had the opportunity to participate in practical hands on workshops in the Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre (GEIC) focusing on subjects such as energy, printed electronics, health and safety and standards and characterisation.

James Baker, CEO Graphene@Manchester said: “We are now seeing rapid developments and an increasing change of pace over the last year, dramatically changing the graphene landscape. More products are entering the market using graphene and we’re starting to see real-world benefits living up to the early excitement of just a few years ago.

With the National Graphene Institute and GEIC, our infrastructure is designed to work in collaboration with industry partners to create, test and optimise new concepts for delivery to market.”

“We are now seeing rapid developments and an increasing change of pace over the last year, dramatically changing the graphene landscape.„

James Baker, CEO Graphene@Manchester

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Tuesday evening also offered a rare chance to hear from Nobel laureate Professor Sir Andre Geim, on his creative approach to scientific research, from levitating frogs to the fascinating phenomena of what happens to discarded graphite after graphene has been made.

The GEIC focuses on industry-led application development in partnership with academics. It will fill a critical gap in the graphene and 2D materials ecosystem by providing facilities which focus on pilot production, characterisation, together with application development in composites, energy, solution formulations and coatings, electronics and membranes.

Tags:  2D materials  Electronics  Graphene  Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre  Healthcare  James Baker  University of Manchester 

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